Internationalization of Higher Education: A Case Study on College Music Teachers' Intercultural Expertise

By Lasonen, Johanna | International Education, October 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Internationalization of Higher Education: A Case Study on College Music Teachers' Intercultural Expertise


Lasonen, Johanna, International Education


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION AND MULTICULTURALISM

Internationalization, which is a central objective of higher education, is apart of the globalization trend. In higher education, internationalization is measured, for example, in terms of international student and teacher exchange, work experience gained abroad, and the number of international publications. International education seems to be separate from the universities' internationalization practices.

The goals of international education are based on the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights and on the recommendations of other documents ratified by Finland (see Allahwerdi, 2001) and the United States. These goals have emphasized the peaceful coexistence of nations, human rights, equality and learning of foreign languages. Multicultural education refers to taking the population's diversity into account in education. At first, multicultural education was seen as a sub-domain of international education. Recently, the term "international education" is more and more often replaced with "global education." It emphasizes skills, knowledge, attitudes and responsibility for the whole Earth and its understanding. As their common denominators, the trends of internationalization and globalization emphasize awareness of and shared responsibility for the diversity of the surrounding world. Today, multicultural education and intercultural education are no longer considered sub-domains of international education. Multiculturalism has a social aspect that is characteristic of societies that consist of multicultural peoples and their communities.

In Finland, multiculturalism in education started to gain emphasis in the 1990s, and intercultural learning came to the fore even later, whereas international education had been a focus much earlier. Especially after World War II, since the late 1940s, the notion of international education gained emphasis, As far as multicultural education is concerned, Finland lags a few decades behind more traditional immigration countries (e.g., the UK, Canada, and the USA). Increasing immigration to Finland has brought multiculturalism to the focus of education, although the traditional minority groups have been living in the country (the Romany, Sami, Tatars, Jews, Karelians, etc.) for a long time. Along with daily encounters with dissimilarity, people have realized that there is a need for intercultural learning, interaction skills and related instruction. Besides the structural factors of education, emphasis is put on the revision of process-, content-, and value-related components that would reflect the acceptance of social, cultural, ethnic, and linguistic diversity.

HUMAN CAPITAL AND INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE

Expertise, with intercultural competence as a part of it, belongs to the category of immaterial capital (see Lasonen & Parikka, 2000). Human capital, which refers to an expert's competence as a resource in the labor market, consists of education, work experience and health. Social capital refers to social contacts and networks that help in building useful connections between persons and groups. In the development of competencies and in finding a job, for instance, we need different yet interrelated types of immaterial capital, both human and social (Salmenhaara, 2008).

Alitolppa-Niitamo (2004) analyzed the school achievement of Somali youngsters living in Finland with regard to human capital, social capital, and certain variables related to their host society (existing ethnic relations, labor market and institutions, government policy and programs as well as changing international borders). From the school achievement point of view, in this study human capital included parents' educational level, their attitudes to education, their socioeconomic status, their mental and physical health, students' prior education and literacy and language skills, and their immigrant documentation.

Musical expertise involves a wide range of competencies pertaining to musical theory, aesthetics, production and reception. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Internationalization of Higher Education: A Case Study on College Music Teachers' Intercultural Expertise
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.