Cover Feature St. Mark's Episcopal Church St. Louis, Missouri Juget-Sinclair Organbuilders Montreal, Quebec

The American Organist, February 2011 | Go to article overview

Cover Feature St. Mark's Episcopal Church St. Louis, Missouri Juget-Sinclair Organbuilders Montreal, Quebec


The opportunity to help design and install a new organ is a unique and wonderful experience for an organist. Such was the opportunity when the decision was made to replace the small, aging, and incomplete 1938 Aeolian-Skinner organ, Opus 979, at St. Mark's Episcopal Church in St. Louis, Missouri. In 2005, when the parish received a substantial legacy from the estate of a parishioner, the late Ruth Proehl, the vestry decided to either rebuild the existing organ or replace it with a new instrument.

An organ committee consisting of Amanda Cashen, Ellen Jeffery, Kim Jungermann, Robert Mullgardt, organist-choirmaster, Barbara Raedeke, Ken Shuler, Joleen Shelton, the Rev. Dr. Lydia Agnew Speller, rector, and John Speller was appointed by the church vestry in 2005, and Deborah Carter was added to that committee in 2007. Barbara Owen was chosen to serve as a consultant to the committee. Her research into the history of the organ and a detailed examination of the instrument made it apparent that restoration or repair of the Aeolian-Skinner would both be costly and not address the limitations of the organ, which had no solo stops, reeds, or strings and only one pedal stop. Replacement was the only reasonable course of action. The committee developed the criteria for a new eclectic instrument, one capable of supporting the Anglican liturgy and playing a wide range of organ literature as a recital instrument. Barbara Owen's experience and insights were of incalculable value to the committee during initial discussions, visits to numerous churches and organbuilders, and final acceptance of the new organ. Her contribution to this process is deeply appreciated.

Early in the process, the committee determined that it was interested in a tracker organ, and then focused on identifying potential builders. An exhaustive search for an organbuilder began in fall 2005, lasted for more than two and a half years, and involved visits to organs in the Midwest and eastern United States. The committee was particularly impressed by the Juget-Sinclair organs at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church in Wellesley, Massachusetts, and Second Presbyterian Church in Nashville, Tennessee. Each organ visit followed a standard approach in evaluating the desired characteristics of the new organ for St. Mark's. Members of the organ committee played a standard repertoire of organ literature, anthem accompaniments, and hymns on each organ, and committee members recorded their impressions of the visual, tonal, mechanical, and overall workmanship of the organs. Based on the committee's impressions from their visits, three organbuilders were asked to prepare designs for the new organ. After careful analysis, the committee unanimously chose Juget-Sinclair, Facteur d'Orgues, Montreal, Quebec, to build the new organ for St. Mark's Church. This recommendation was presented to the church vestry on November 8, 2007, and the contract for a new 20-stop Juget-Sinclair organ was signed in December 2007. The organ was under construction in Quebec during 2008 and the first half of 2009. It was installed at St. Mark's Church, September 13-24, 2009, and tonal finishing was completed between October 15 and November 5, 2009. The members of the Juget-Sinclair firm responsible for building Opus 32 were Robin Côté, François Couture, Dean Eckmann, JeanDominique FeIx, Denis Juget, Céline Richard, Stephen Sinclair, and Jerome Veenendaal.

A major consideration for the design of the new organ was St. Mark's unique acoustical environment. Designed by architects Charles Nagel and Frederick Dunn and constructed in 1938, the building is a designated architectural landmark of the Moderne style of architecture. The relatively small building, which seats about 200 people, is rather like an Oxford or Cambridge college chapel, rectangular and considerably taller than it is wide. It has excellent acoustics of three to four seconds of reverberation without any of the distortion, echo, or "harsh slap" sometimes encountered in a room of hard surfaces. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cover Feature St. Mark's Episcopal Church St. Louis, Missouri Juget-Sinclair Organbuilders Montreal, Quebec
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.