Websites for Students and Teachers of Singing

By Anderson, Patrick | Journal of Singing, March/April 2011 | Go to article overview

Websites for Students and Teachers of Singing


Anderson, Patrick, Journal of Singing


WHEN LEARNING AN OPERA ROLE or art song, the student and teacher of singing will commonly refer to sources that have been made widely available in printed form. For art song there are books by Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Berton Coffin, Phillip L. Miller, Eric Sams, and Pierre Bernac; for opera resources, books by Nico Castel, and Anthony Peattie and the Earl of Harewood; or for sacred pieces sources by Ron Jeffers.1 These texts can be found in most music and larger metropolitan libraries, as well as easily purchased on popular media websites like Amazon.com, LeyerlePublications.com, TISMusic.com, and even EBay. But for those musicians working with a budget, and limited space on the bookshelf, what does one do when the library is closed, and purchasing these resources isn't a possibility? The answer: surf the web.

In today's hi-tech world, the Internet has made information more accessible than ever before. Students today use the Internet at every turn, from researching papers, to registering for classes, and applying for schools and jobs. E-mail is used to keep contact with colleagues, friends, and family; e-newsletters are beginning to replace paper newsletters. Instead of listening to the radio in the car or at home, people are beginning to download Podcasts that give them the ability to listen to news, gossip, or interviews on their own time. Opera singers are creating their own websites to showcase their past, present, and future engagements. The personal website functions as an online business card and portfolio. Opera companies advertise upcoming seasons and catalogue past performances, promote ticket sales, solicit monetary and voluntary support, and advertise auditions for upcoming seasons. Many sites have also been created for scholarly purposes and are useful for both teachers and students of singing alike in their study.

I keep the websites discussed here in my bookmarks folder, and I hope you give them a click and see what they hold. So go on . . . click away. I have highlighted and organized websites into the following categories: search engines, websites connected to groups, websites for research and information, websites for music careers, and miscellaneous websites.

SEARCH ENGINES

A basic place to start when surfing the web, the search engine permits the surfer to find almost anything, using only a few key words. The search engine allows the singer to do research on the source of music itself (language, videos and sound clips, history, etc.) and gives a jumping off point for a given work or topic. Many search engines also offer a variety of other services such as web-hosting for personal websites and web-based e-mail. Prominent search engines include http://www.google.com, http:// www.yahoo.com, http://www.ask.com, http://www.bing. com, and Microsoft's http://www.live.com.

WEBSITES FOR RESEARCH AND INFORMATION

In addition to the general search engine, there are also many sites with searchable information specific to the classical singer and pedagogue. If one does not own print sources on interpretation, translation, and history of both composer and work, finding such sources can be hard to do when the library has shut its doors for the day. And with the busy lives of students and performers, working around that schedule can be a difficult feat to accomplish. Enter the websites for research and information. While those listed represent only a small cross section of what is available, these websites afford a good place to start exploring what the Internet has to offer.

Operissimo-http://www.operissimo.com

Think of this site as a basic search engine and database of anything about opera. Operissimo offers a basic search of any stage work by classical composers. The surfer can search by composer and work, and also search for artists, agencies, opera houses, and available recordings. One of the best features about this website is how all entries and headings are interconnected. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Websites for Students and Teachers of Singing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.