Selling the Fountain of Youth: How the Anti-Aging Industry Made a Disease out of Getting Old-And Made Billions

Aging Today, November/December 2010 | Go to article overview

Selling the Fountain of Youth: How the Anti-Aging Industry Made a Disease out of Getting Old-And Made Billions


The following is an excerpt from the preface and Chapter One of the book Selling the Fountain of Youth: How the Anti-Aging Industry Made a Disease Out of Getting Old And Made Billions by Arlene Weintraub. Excerpted by arrangement with Basic Books, a member of the Perseus Books Group. Copyright © 2010.

I first wandered into the odd world of anti-aging medicine while working as a science writer for Business Week. It was 2005, and I was reporting a story on a new wave of drugs designed to help children who couldn't grow properly. The biotechnology innovation known as human growth hormone (HGH) was the most widely accepted treatment for these children, and parents were still clamoring for it. But as I called various doctors to report the story, some of them told me they were disturbed about an entirely different trend they were seeing: Aging adults wanted to take HGH, too.

I wondered, why would any fully grown adult need growth hormone? That single question opened my eyes to an emerging specialty called anti-aging medicine. The deeper I dug, the more fascinated I became with the bizarre and ever-growing medicine chest of drugs anti-aging doctors were prescribing - and the hordes of patients who seemed to have no idea that these treatments could be seriously risky.

You wake up on Monday, bound out of bed, head for the medicine cabinet, and grab a syringe filled with human growth hormone. With no hesitation, you stick the needle into a fold of skin on your thigh and press die plunger. Then you open a tube of estrogen cream that you bought from the neighborhood pharmacist and rub a dollop of it into your arm. You're 56 years old, but your hot flashes are a distant nightmare, and you wake up with the energy of a 20-year-old. You attribute your newfound youth not only to die growth hormone and the estrogen but also to the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin, which you take every night. You've heard that some hormones can cause cancer, but you're not too worried. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Selling the Fountain of Youth: How the Anti-Aging Industry Made a Disease out of Getting Old-And Made Billions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.