Bring History to Life

By Dodd, Melinda | Working Mother, April 2010 | Go to article overview

Bring History to Life


Dodd, Melinda, Working Mother


Explore Hidden Dwellings SANTA FE, NM

Long before it became a center of Southwestern art, Santa Fe played host to a wild cast of characters, including Pueblo Indians, Spanish colonists, Mexican politicians and American traders - and their influence is everywhere. Experience it Walking into the San Miguel Mission, a church erected for the poor in i6io, inspires awe. The shrine to Our Lady of Guadalupe at El Santuario de Guadalupe mesmerizes. So do intricate works of iron, tin, silver and bone at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, where kids can enjoy treasure hunts and craft projects. Gape at serpentine-design bowls at the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, then hear Native-American tales at the nearby Wheelwright Museum. Stroll around the Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary, where foxes, rabbits and bobcats dart through the bush. Just a half hour away, climb ladders into Pueblo cave dwellings at Bandelier National Monument, in Los Alamos. Have fun Visit the Santa Fe School of Cooking, where they make salsa and three different kinds of tamales. At Kakawa Chocolate House, taste the Aztec Warrior Elixir, a "drinking chocolate" with spices, herbs, chili - even flowers! Stop by the Santa Fe Children's Museum for face painting and giant-bubble blowing, or romp around Shidoni Foundry's eight-acre sculpture garden, a five-minute drive. Relax at the Old Santa Fe Inn, where kiva-style fireplaces and Jacuzzi tubs welcome guests. Rooms from $109 (800-734-9910, oldsantafeinn.com). Contact 800-777-2489, santafe.org.

* Meet the Founding Fathers

COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG, VA Perhaps no other place epitomizes the birth of our nation and its lofty ambitions as well as Williamsburg. Once the capital of Virginia, it's where Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and George Washington ignited the legislature and strategized during the American Revolution. Today, the cobblestone streets of this reconstructed town bustle with costumed cooks, blacksmiths, plantation owners, soldiers and bewigged politicians, providing a glimpse of life as it was. Experience it There's a lot for all to see in this 301-acre area, so take the 30-minute Children's Orientation Walk, where guides point out activities best suited to kids. Dress up in period costume and tour the grounds via horse-drawn carriage to make your family feel like part of the action, then journey on to Benjamin Powell House to experience colonial games and chores. In Revolutionary City, history-book figures chat with children and participate in Q&As. Before you go, be sure to lock the kids in the pillories for a picture. Have fun Let little ones dip candles and wonder at the colorful molten wax at the insanely popular Yankee Candle flagship in Williamsburg; the Holiday Park inside the store boasts year-round snow and visits by Santa. Busch Gardens' Europeanthemed rides (such as the Loch Ness Monster) would horrify colonists but make today's kids go wild with delight. Don't miss a 4-D dinosaur movie at Ripley's Believe It or Not! Relax at the Williamsburg Lodge, offering family packages and a sweet spa. Rooms from $159 (757-253-2277, colonialwilliamsburgresort.com). Contact 800-HISTORY, colonial williamsburg.com.

Ride with the Amish LANCASTER COUNTY, PA

Glimpses of men with beards and girls in white caps from this lovely region have long piqued children's curiosity about the Amish and other Pennsylvania Dutch. Here, kids can get a true taste of Amish and Mennonite life. Experience it For a quick primer, visit Lancaster's Mennonite Information Center and view the feature, Who Are the Amish? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bring History to Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.