Around the Nation

By Scanlan, Laura Wolff | Humanities, March/April 2011 | Go to article overview

Around the Nation


Scanlan, Laura Wolff, Humanities


A Roundup of Activities Sponsored bv the State Humanities Councils

ALABAMA

Musician Bobby Horton presents "The Stories of Alabama FoUc Art" at the Vulcan Park and Museum in Birmingham on April 7. After the performance, participants can preview the exhibition "The Music Lives On: Folk Song Traditions Told by Alabama Artists," which opens to the pubUc April 15.

The Alabama Book Festival will be held in Montgomery on April 16. Activities include readings, book signings, and writing workshops.

The Montevallo Literary Festival takes place at the University of Montevallo on April 15. Writers include Peter Guralnick, Greg Williamson, T. J. Beitelman, A. M. Garner, Carrie JerreU, Matthew Pitt, Jorge Sánchez, and Elizabeth Wetmore.

ARIZONA

The Deer VaUey Rock Art Center in Phoenix reopens its permanent exhibition space on March 26 with new exhibits exploring southwest Arizona's desert archaeology.

The Smithsonian traveling exhibition "Key Ingrethents: America by Food" opens at the Oracle Historical Society's Acadia Ranch and Museum on March 19. Events include a native plants trail walk on March 26 and 27 and a historic ranch kitchen tour on April 23.

Yavapai Community College's Hassayampa Institute hosts "Literary Southwest" featuring authors Aimee Bender and Al Young on April 15. The Yuma Main Library presents "Authors Across America" teen book discussion series, March 31-April 28. The Cutler-Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center in Phoenix opens its newly renovated museum on April 1.

CONNECTICUT

Civil War commemoration events begin with the firing of cannons at Founders Bridge on the Connecticut River in Hartford on April 12, followed by "The Start of the War: Fort Sumter and Beyond," a lecture by Matt Warshauer at Connecticut's Old State House. David BUghts gives a keynote address to open a Civil War conference at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain, April 15-17.

"Harriet Beecher Stowe: 200 Years of Inspiration to Action" remains on display at the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Hartford during March and April.

"Connecticut Needlework: Women, Art, and Family, 1740-1840" is on display at the Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford through March 26, showcasing more than seventy works.

As part of the "History Bites" lunch series, talks include "Caroline Ferriday: Ravensbruck Survivors Godmother" at the BeUamy-Ferriday House and Garden in Bethlehem on April 14, "Woodbury Silversmiths circa 1799-1845" at Glebe House Museum in Woodbury on April 21, and "Sheep: An Important Part of American History" at Flanders Nature Center in Woodbury on April 28.

FLORIDA

"Florida: History Moment," a series of five-minute audio programs, are accessible online at www.flahum.org as part of a statewide commemoration of Florida and Spain's 500-year relationship, which began when Ponce de León landed on Florida's shore in 1513. Programs include stories about Spanish conquistadors, colonists, pirate attacks on St. Augustine, and the first Cuban Americans.

"Stories Beneath Our Feet" continues at Mound House in Fort Myers. The underground archaeological exhibition explores its history - a shell mound site that belonged to the preColumbian Calusa Indians - as weU as the Cuban fishing industry in Florida, early homesteaders, the Koreshan Unity reHgious group, boom-and-bust developers, and southwest Florida pioneers.

GEORGIA

Holocaust survivors share their stories on a Sunday each month at the WilUam Breman Jewish Heritage and Holocaust Museum in Atlanta. George Rishfeld gives a talk on March 13 and Penina Bowman speaks on April 3.

The Oglethorpe University Museum of Art in Atlanta presents a series of educational workshops on the modern artwork of India, including batik portraiture for children on March 26 and porfrait-pamting on April 23.

ILLINOIS

Road Scholars Speakers Bureau programs include "Messages in the Music - Songs of Protest and Hope" with Shanta NuruUah at the Hillside PubHc Library on March 6; "Captain Terry - Civil War Naval Officer," a historical portrayal by Edward F. …

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