Dance Teacher Recognizes

Dance Teacher, November 2002 | Go to article overview

Dance Teacher Recognizes


Dance Teacher presents teachers who complete a continuing dance education program by the organizations on the following page with a special Dance Teacher certificate of recognition. Simply send a letter to DT Recognizes, Dance Teacher, 250 West 57th Street, Suite 420, NewYork, NY 10 107. Please include the name of the organization, proof of participation in the program you attended and a brief description of how the experience improved your teaching. Dance Teacher salutes the following educators who have completed American Tap Dance Institute's Teacher Training & Certification Program.

American Tap Dance Institute's annual Teacher Training & Certification Program is open to 15 working professionals from any country with at least two years of experience teaching tap. The course-the only teacher training program offered by a professional tap dance company, National Tap Ensemble, U.S.A.-has been in existence since 1998. The program is spread out over one year, with three weeklong intensive sessions spaced six months apart and held in locations across the country.

Topics of study and research include tap dance fundamentals, history, theory, pedagogy, methodology, notation, elementary musicianship, curriculum building and tapology. Participants learn how to perform and teach pieces of early tap repertory, some dating from more than a century ago, and view and analyze rare film footage from ATDI's archives. Graduates have their photos and bios posted on ATDI's website as a free job referral service and are eligible to teach at ATDI's annual Spirit of Tap Conference. Pre-application forms can be filled out online.

For more information, including rates and participants' feedback: Miles Johnson, American Tap Dance Institute, POBox 2439, Hagerstown, MD 21741-2439; phone: 888-NTE-TAPS; fax: 775-703-5519; e-mail: pr1@usatap.org; web: www. …

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