Women Are the New Economic Powerhouse

By Dychtwald, Maddy | Aging Today, March/April 2011 | Go to article overview

Women Are the New Economic Powerhouse


Dychtwald, Maddy, Aging Today


We've seen amazing technological and political evolution across the past century, but the single most powerful economic change has not been caused by technology or the rise of developing nations. It has been created by women.

A hundred years ago, the world looked very different. Cars and telephones were scarce, television not invented and apples were just a tasty fruit. Women couldn't vote, own property or even open a bank account in their name. Education was available primarily to wealthy women, and a woman's path to personal success was often extremely limited.

Even with all that technological and global change, women's influence has had an even larger impact on our economy. The Economist in 2006 wrote that over the past two decades, "women have contributed more to global GDP growth than have either new technology or the new giants, China and India." And that's just the beginning.

Last year, 72% of all high school valedictorians were women. For every 100 men graduating from college, there are 133 women, giving women the tools to succeed in the new economy. And they are. For the first time in history, women make up more than half of the workforce. While men's earning power has remained flat over the last several decades, women's earning power has grown exponentially. In fact, today nearly a quarter of wives outearn their husbands.

SUPER SPENDERS

And women are taking that earning power and spending it in the marketplace. In fact, women represent a whopping 83% of consumer purchases, including 90% of food purchases, 80% of healthcare spending, 93% of overthe-counter pharmaceuticals. 55% of consumer electronics, 53% of stock market investments and 62% of new car purchases. They're the primary market for just about everything.

With increasing speed, women are unleashing their influence to reshape our world. For example: in the United States, women start their own businesses at twice the rate of the national average, and are the leaders in bringing our country out of the recession. In developing nations, 90% of women who earn income reinvest it in families and communities - by sending kids to school or buying clean water and electricity for their communities - compared wim only 30% to 70% of men. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Women Are the New Economic Powerhouse
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.