Developing and Implementing a Master of Archival Studies Program: A Collaborative Effort of a State University, a State Archives, and the National Archives and Records Administration

By Long, Cherie | Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

Developing and Implementing a Master of Archival Studies Program: A Collaborative Effort of a State University, a State Archives, and the National Archives and Records Administration


Long, Cherie, Journal of Education for Library and Information Science


Born-digital materials, combined with the large amount of analog information that is being digitized and stored electronically, require digital information professionals to be versed in archival as well as information technology skills. To help fill the growing demand for digital archival skills and knowledge, Clayton State University, in a collaborative venture with the Georgia Archives and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Southeast Region, created a Master of Archival Studies program. Developed over a four-year period, the program integrates technology skills and knowledge into every course in the curriculum. The curriculum also incorporates service-based learning through practicums/internships, requiring students to apply the archival and technological knowledge gained from the classroom to real-world situations. This paper describes the process undertaken by the three organizations to identify and define the educational goals of the program. Details are provided on how the program and curriculum were developed and implemented such that every course joined the traditional theories and practices of archival studies with the information technology skills needed in today's digital world. This account will be useful for institutions and faculty who are developing or revising programs and curricula integrating technology with traditional theories and practices.

Keywords: archives education, experiential learning, archives employment, technology skills, service-learning, case study

The arrival of the digital age has created a strong and immediate need for digital archivists/digital asset managers/digital preservation officers who have a particularly broad skill set. The modern day digital archivist must have a broad range of technological skills coupled with a comprehensive system for the preservation of both born-digital information and analog information which has been or needs to be digitized. Unfortunately, archival education has not kept pace with the world's adaptation to the digital age.

Archival education in the United States began after the 1 934 founding of the National Archives and the 1936 formation of the Society of American Archivists. However, Archival Studies did not become its own area of education and research in the United States until the 1 990s (White & GiIliland, 2010). Prior to that, archivists came from history backgrounds and primarily received on-the-job training. Beginning in the 1990s, the archival profession transitioned from relying on on-the-job training to requiring a master's degree, usually in Library and Information Science (LIS), for entry into and mobility within the field (Bastian & Yankel, 2005). However, even though graduates with LIS master's degrees were preferred over those with master's degrees in history, both types of programs were very traditional in terms of educational structure and content (Yankel, 2000). A recent study by White and Gilliland (20 1 0, p. 232) found archival education focused "too narrowly on the traditional paradigmatic aspects of archival science (i.e. the professional canon of theory and practice)"

In response to the growing demand for digital archival skills and knowledge and the increasingly sophisticated technological skills required of digital archivists, Clayton State University collaborated with the Georgia Archives (GA) and the National Archives and Records Administration Southeast Region (NARA/SE) to create a Master of Archival Studies program which incorporates traditional archival science and education with the sophisticated digital technology skills needed by the modern day archivist. The curriculum also integrates service-learning - a method of teaching, learning, and reflecting that combines classroom education with community service so that students can maximize the educational experience and graduate with the archival and technological skills needed in the modern day archival profession. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Developing and Implementing a Master of Archival Studies Program: A Collaborative Effort of a State University, a State Archives, and the National Archives and Records Administration
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.