Obituary: David R. Wright 1939-2009

By Roberts, Margaret | Geography, Autumn 2010 | Go to article overview

Obituary: David R. Wright 1939-2009


Roberts, Margaret, Geography


David Wright, who died of cancer in November 2009, never lost his fascination for places. He is probably most widely known for the Philip's Children's Atlas but he should also be remembered for many other publications through which he showed his commitment to stimulating young people's interest in the world and to campaigning for what he believed in.

David read geography at St Catherine's College, Cambridge University. After graduating and studying for his PGCE, he taught geography at Alleyne's Grammar School, Stevenage and at Mt. Lebanon High School in Pennsylvania. Shortly after his return to England he moved to Norwich to work as a teacher educator at Keswick Hall College of Education (1969-1981) which later became the School of Education in the University of East Anglia (1981-1994). Following his early retirement in 1994 he became a self-employed author, school inspector and consultant. He served the Norfolk branch of the Geographical Association as both Chair and as President.

David's life-long interest in places, stamps and trains was evident from childhood. At the age of 10 he created a 'country' in his back garden, complete with currency, stamps and stations. Later as a teacher and then a parent he shared these passions with his students and his children. In his first teaching post, according to one of his students, 'he used to take us on mini expeditions enjoying the delights of quarries, rubbish dumps, gravel pits and the last day of trains on the Buntingford Branch. A truly inspired man. He gave me a lifelong passion for travel and geography.' From his home at Mulbarton, near Norwich, he enjoyed taking his children to Norfolk beaches, particularly on stormy days when they could see erosion taking place.

David always loved travelling. By the end of the 1960s, when travel abroad was lesson common than today, David had organised school trips to Italy and Morocco and had travelled to many European countries, South Africa, the USA and had got as far as Iran on the Hippy Bus to India. Jill, whom he married in 1972, shared this passion and they travelled together all over the world, using many of the photographs they took in their atlases. By the end of his life, David had visited 106 countries.

David's whole family has been involved in his publications. The Ph/7/ps Children's Atlas, first published in 1987 and now in its 12th edition, was written jointly by David and Jill. It received a GA award for 'making a significant contribution to geography' and has been hugely successful, having sold over a million copies worldwide. David and Jill are co-authors of a further 14 books. The Philip's Early Years Atlas and Philip's Infant School Atlas, published in 2009, were jointly written by David and his daughter, Rachel Noonan, using her children (his grandchildren) as 'special advisors'. David and Jill's son, Steven, designed and created their website: www.dandjwright.co.uk

David published over 100 articles, mostly related to geographical education but some related to his interests in stamps, railways and hymns. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Obituary: David R. Wright 1939-2009
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.