AJS Membership Has Its Privileges (and Its Responsibilities and Opportunities)

By Johnston, William D. | Judicature, March/April 2011 | Go to article overview

AJS Membership Has Its Privileges (and Its Responsibilities and Opportunities)


Johnston, William D., Judicature


I've been a member of the American Judicature Society for close to 30 years - - since 1983. I was fortunate to receive a complimentary membership from the judge for whom I was clerking at the time, and I have maintained the membership ever since.

This President's Report has me pausing to reflect on the benefits - and the responsibilities and opportunities - associated with AJS membership. The topic is a vitally important one, since AJS is a broadlybased membership organization of citizens (judges, lawyers, and nonlawyers) concerned with improving our nation's justice system.

Perhaps the most significant benefit of AJS membership is that each of us, as a member, is part of an organization that focuses on improving the administration of justice for all. As a corollary, each of us is presented with a responsibility and an opportunity. As observed by AJS Board member The Honorable Delissa Ridgwày of the U.S. Court of International Trade: "AJS is not liberal, and it's not conservative; it's not pro-defense or pro-prosecution or pro-plaintiff. It is committed to fundamental fairness, and to enhancing the administration of justice."

AJS Past President Robert M. Kaufman (a partner with Proskauer Rose LLP in New York City) echoes Judge Ridgway's sentiment: "To me, the single most important benefit of membership is being a participant in the work of improving the administration of justice nationally. All the other things - publications and periodicals, etc. - are nice, but the participation in actual improvements is great." And former AJS Board Member and current Member of the AJS National Advisory Council Momi Cazimero, a graphic designer (non-lawyer) in Honolulu, Hawaii, comments: "The word I have used to describe AJS* mission is 'vigilance.' Especially at a time when we feel besieged - now - it is easiest to bypass and ignore doing the 'right thing' or remaining 'vigilant' because we feel overwhelmed. That is when we are the most vulnerable."

The other benefits of AJS membership are many. The most obvious include receipt of this bi-monthly, peer-reviewed journal, Judicature, published continuously since 1917. All judicial members of AJS also receive the quarterly Judicial Conduct Reporter, a one-of-a-kind resource for the latest on judicial ethics and discipline. And many of our members receive the Society's electronic newsletter, Judicatories. (If you are not currently receiving Judicatories, please send a message to membership@ajs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

AJS Membership Has Its Privileges (and Its Responsibilities and Opportunities)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.