Wilhelm Röpke's Political Economy

By Anderson, Ryan T. | First Things; A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life, June/July 2011 | Go to article overview

Wilhelm Röpke's Political Economy


Anderson, Ryan T., First Things; A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life


Wilhelm Röpke's Political Economy BY SAMUEL GREGG EDWARD ELGAR, 216 PAGES, $115

Once upon a time, a political economist could write a book titled An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations and another one titled The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Not so anymore. Though derogatively called "the dismal science," economics was originally a "moral science." But trends in rationalism and scientism over the last two centuries turned it into a "value-free" social science - to some, just a form of applied mathematics.

Wilhelm Röpke, a neglected twentieth-century intellectual giant, stood in direct opposition to this trend. Röpke's approach recognizes the objective aspects of the economic science but insists that normative values lie at its core; a healthy polity must move beyond calculations of utility if it is to uphold just and humane economic institutions. Samuel Gregg, author of award-winning titles such as Economic Thinking for the Theologically Minded, On Ordered Liberty, The Commercial Society, and The Modern Papacy (on John Paul IPs and Benedict XVI's social and political thought), highlights Röpke's more humane approach to political economy.

Gregg offers technically sophisticated yet accessible discussions of Röpke's analysis of the interwar economic crisis; booms, recessions, and business cycles; his via media between Keynes and Hayek on full employment, inflation, and the welfare state; and his vision for a neoliberal international economy. Perhaps most interesting is Gregg's discussion of Röpke's efforts to reform the discipline of economics and political economy, striking a position "between humanism and social science. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Wilhelm Röpke's Political Economy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.