Bullet 50 Jeans

By Martinez, Laura; Soulette, Harry | Law & Order, October 2002 | Go to article overview

Bullet 50 Jeans


Martinez, Laura, Soulette, Harry, Law & Order


Bullet 50 clothing was designed for both on-duty and off-duty use for officers who normally wear blue jeans. The Bullet 50 line of clothing was been developed and tested by officer Joseph Salazar, a veteran of the San Francisco, CA, Police. He is still an active member of the department, working gangs and narcotics in the Ingleside and Mission districts.

The number one complaint Salazar had while working plain clothes was the lack of functional clothing for law enforcement use. Standard jeans worn by most officers in plain clothes working units like gang, narcotics, special enforcement details, tactical training and off duty are not built for law enforcement needs. This usually meant fanny packs, which sent obvious signals, or gear hanging on belts causing noise. Bullet 50 addresses all those needs.

Bullet 50 is unique to law enforcement. Salazar wanted a simple name that persons working law enforcement could identify with. Bullets represent speed, power and are essential tools in law enforcement. Fifty or 50 represents five-o, street slang for police. The majority of street thugs, gangsters and dope dealers in the city of San Francisco, yell FIVE-O to alert others that the police are in the area.

For several years in the city of San Francisco, while Salazar was conducting arrest searches and during take-on's in the street, Salazar noticed (and all officers should take note) gangsters and dope dealers were wearing designer clothing that catered to the hip hop/gangster rap culture. The baggy clothing often had hidden pockets in the linings and other areas inside the pant or jacket. Gangster rappers often wear and promote this type of clothing the same way NFL players promote Nike.

Those types of clothing can be an officer safety issue if used to conceal weapons or hide narcotics. So it was obvious to Salazar that gangsters and dope dealers had clothing to help them succeed in criminal activity. Salazar felt officers needed clothing to help combat those same criminal activities on the street.

Until Bullet 50, no clothing was designed for the street cop to help conceal his tools of the trade. Any sport has specifically designed clothing. Any proactive law enforcement officer will say chasing criminals all day provides the activity and adrenaline of any sport. If a gangster rapper from Long Beach can have his own clothing label, why not a street cop from San Francisco?

The Flagship product for Bullet 50 is the denim jean from the Street Crime Line. The street crime line denim jean will carry most all-essential gear needed for on and off duty operations. Bullet 50's solution was to make individual, built-in, internal pockets for all the gear street cops need to carry: pistol, ammo mags, flashlight, ASP, handcuffs, pepper spray, pic radio, cell phone, etc. These pockets were added on the inside of a normal pair of jeans, with the pockets specifically sized and shaped for tools used in law enforcement.

Bullet 50 uses quality material and double stitching. All of Bullet 50's clothing is made in the United States in the garment district of Los Angeles.

Testing was one of the most important parts of development for Salazar and the Bullet 50 staff. All Bullet 50 clothing is designed and tested by officers out on the street in real time. Prototype jeans where given to several officers in the San Francisco Bay Area to test comfort while seated in a patrol car, accessibility to ammo and ASP pockets. …

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