Battling Bullying

By Alessi, Scott | Momentum, April/May 2011 | Go to article overview

Battling Bullying


Alessi, Scott, Momentum


As bullying has become a growing concern nationwide, Catholic schools are taking action to address the problem before it happens

It happens every day at schools around the country, in most cases going unreported and unseen. It causes thousands of children to stay home from school each day and it can leave long-lasting emotional and psychological scars. But as more parents and educators are becoming aware of its prevalence, Catholic schools are beginning to take a strong stand against bullying.

In recent years, stories of bullying that has gone too far-often with tragic consequences-have become common in the mainstream media. And while the number of incidents that make the news continues to grow, there are still untold numbers of children who suffer through severe cases of bullying without anyone ever knowing.

"Bullying occurs in just about every school and it occurs under the radar," said Philip Lazarus, president-elect of the National Association of School Psychologists and director of the School Psychology Training Program at Florida International University. "A lot of kids just won't tell teachers or administrators if they are actually being bullied."

Studies indicate that as many as 30 percent of all students are in some way involved in bullying: 13 percent as bullies, 11 percent as targets of bullying and six percent as both a bully and a victim. By the time they graduate high school. 70 percent of all students report having been bullied at some point in their education, with many cases being repeated and prolonged. Yet only one in eight students who say they have been bullied reported the abuse to an adult, either due to fear of retaliation, feelings of shame or the belief that nothing would be done about it.

Part of the reason for the pervasiveness of bullying today, according to Lazarus, is the wide array of forms that it can take. At one time, bullying was limited to physical violence, name calling or being ostracized by other students at school, all things that would end when a child went home. But now, bullying can occur any time, from any place.

"We have kinds of bullying that we didn't ever have before." said Lazarus, pointing to the vast amount of online incidents, known as cyberbullying. "Technology really makes things a lot worse because technology is 24/7," he explained. "A youngster can be bullied through Web pages, through social networking sites like Facebook or MySpace, they can get bullied any time they turn on their phone, so they can't escape it. And the cyberbullying in many ways is even more destructive of a youngster's feeling of self esteem sometimes than the physical bullying."

But Lazarus, a consultant on bullying prevention for the national Catholic child protection program Virtus, said that there are a number of steps schools can take to counteract bullying in all its forms.

"There are effective programs that focus on knowledge, that focus on attitude change, that teach skill development through modeling and role play," he said. "But those efforts need to be continued for a long time. Patience is required, and if you are looking to change the culture of a school, it can take one, two, even five years to make an appreciable difference."

Zero Tolerance

With the increased focus on cases of school bullying in the media, many Catholic schools have responded by instituting comprehensive anti-bullying policies, which clearly spell out what types of behavior constitute bullying and what steps will be taken if disciplinary action is needed.

At St. Louis Catholic School in Castroville, Texas, input from the entire school community was used to develop an anti-bullying policy in 2009. While bullying had not been a serious issue in the school, reported incidents at public schools in nearby San Antonio created a growing awareness of the problem, said Principal Larry Dorsey-Spitz.

"We're all aware of it constantly," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Battling Bullying
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.