You're Hired

The American Conservative, July 2011 | Go to article overview

You're Hired


Poor old Donald Trump. The president of the United States stands up in a cavernous, packed ballroom and makes fun of him at the White House Correspondents'

Dinner while thousands laugh their heads off. The Donald remains stonyfaced and unsmiling, stoic like an ancient Greek.

So what does the media have to say about him the next day? If memory serves, no adjectives were used that one could apply to a Greek, ancient or otherwise. Self-smitten, rude, namedropping braggart who mistreats lesser souls, a pompous jerk who acts like an oligarch- you name it, they said it. That the Donald can be bombastic, boorish, and a blowhard is undeniable. But he can also be funny.

The last time we came face to face was during Conrad Black's famous birthday dinner for Barbara Black, an expense that helped prosecutors paint Lord Black as a crook (as false a charge as the denial by Donald Trump that he's a habitual user of body waxing). "He's better than Shakespeare!" cried Donald while extending his hand to me. He continued to praise me during the ensuing guffaws, to the great amusement of my friends as well as enemies. (I had almost come to blows with Richard Burt during the party.) This was vintage Donald Trump. One didn't know whether he was "taking the mickey" or not. It was certainly over the top.

Despite a rather messy personal life, Trump briefly rose to the top of some polls for the 2012 Republican presidential bid. His pluses are name recognition and business credentials; his minuses are his hair and his solipsism. His reason for running is very simple: He likes to see his name in the papers. Trump has as much desire to go the whole way as I do to spend a weekend in the company of Bill Clinton and his child-molesting friend Jeffrey Epstein. Trump's bid, bad pun intended, is yet another PR con to keep his name in lights. And with the kind of celebrity-obsessed media we have, what could be easier?

The Donald knows how to play the culture. While he was still married to Ivana, many years ago, he had her ring up Lee Radziwill, Jackie Onassis's sister, and ask Lee's advice on how to redo the East Room in case Donald ran for president. I can hear the conversation: "Do we take down the portrait of Madison and replace it with that of Franklin Pierce?" If Ivana had ever heard of either, that is. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

You're Hired
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.