The Effect of Gender on Organizational Commitment of Teachers: A Meta Analytic Analysis

By Aydin, Ayhan; Sarier, Yilmaz et al. | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

The Effect of Gender on Organizational Commitment of Teachers: A Meta Analytic Analysis


Aydin, Ayhan, Sarier, Yilmaz, Uysal, Sengül, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of gender on the organizational commitment of teachers. In this respect, the levels of organizational commitment were also investigated with organizational commitment. Fifteen master and doctorate theses done between 2005-2009 were analyzed using meta analysis. At the end of the research study, the mean effect size was calculated as -0,07. It means that the effect of gender on the organizational commitment is on the favor of males. Particularly, it was found that the effect of gender is in the favor of males at the levels of identification and internalization. Male teachers can adopt the norms and values of the organization easier than females. On the other hand, female teachers have a tendency of organizational commitment so as to carry on their acquisition.

Key Words

Organizational Commitment, Meta Analysis, Educational Administration.

(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)

A human being who is a social creature spends his most of lifetime in organizations. An organization emerges in need of cooperation. People need cooperation in order to fulfill their purposes. While an organization is a tool to accomplish one's purpose, an individual can be thought as a tool to succeed in organizational purposes.

Organizational commitment is the promise and pledge of any responsibility in the future (Zangaro, 2001, p. 14). Organizational commitment is a responsibility felt by an employee in order to identify with the norms and purposes of the organization (Buchanan, 1974, p. 533). Organizational commitment can't be thought as a simple loyalty. Organizational commitment has been defined as involving an employee's loyalty to the organization, willingness to exert effort on behalf of the organization, degree of goal and value congruency with the organization, and desire to maintain membership (Cohen, 2007, p. 336).

In the light of all these definitions, organizational commitment is a definite desire to maintain organizational membership, identification with the purposes, successes of organization, the loyalty of an employee,and a willingness to exert considerable effort on the behalf of the organization.

There are various classification for organizational commitment. In Turkey, the classification performed by O'Reilly and Chatman (1986, p. 492) with Allen and Meyer (1990, p. 2-5) was mostly used. O'Reilly and Chatman (1986, p. 492) implies three levels for organizational commitment:

The Level of Accordance

The level of accordance defines a shallow organizational loyalty (Balay, 2000, p. 68). The employees feel the necessity of accordance in order to record gains. Accordance is the first step of commitment. It is possible to say that an individual feels the necessity of accordance because of an award or a penalty. An individual tries to accord with the others for pay rise or promotion (Bursalioglu, 2005, p. 143).

The Level of Identification

It is the second level of commitment. Identification defines the influence between the individual and the group. An individual feels himself as a part of the group when he gets the opportunity to express himself freely. When a person identifies with the organization, his job satisfaction gets higher while his tolerance with the ambiguity is low. If his level of identification is high, he accepts the success of the organization as his own (Basaran, 2000, p. 33).

The Level of Internalization

This is the last level of commitment. It defines the accordance between the organizational and personal norms. An employee makes the organizational norms and values willingly not by forcing (Bursalioglu, 2005, p. 144).

Allen and Meyer (1990) identify three types of commitment; affective commitment, continuance commitment and normative commitment.

Affective Commitment

Affective commitment is defined as the emotional attachment, identification and involvement that an employee has with organization and goals (Wiener, 1982, p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Effect of Gender on Organizational Commitment of Teachers: A Meta Analytic Analysis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.