Ex Libris


BOOKS PUBLISHED RECENTLY WITH NEH SUPPORT

AWARD WINNERS

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION. Best fìrst book in the history of religion. Novetzke, Christian Lee. Religion and Public Memory: A Cultural History of Saint Namdev in India New York: Columbia University Press, 2008.

AMERICAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE ASSOCIATION. Harry Levin Prize for best book in literary history and criticism. Potkay, Adam. The Story of Joy: From the Bible to Late Romanticism, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION. J. Russell Major Prize for the best work in English on any aspect of French history. Fuchs, Rachel. Contested Paternity: Constructing Families in Modern France. Battimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION. Premio Del Rey Prize for best book on medieval Spain. Blumenthal, Debra. Enemies and Familiars: Slavery and Mastery in Fifteenth-Century Valencia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009.

ASSOCIATION OF BLACK WOMEN HISTORIANS. Letitia Woods Brown Prìze for best book on African-American women. Washington, Margaret. Sojourner Truth's America. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009.

JEWISH BOOK COUNCIL. National Jewish Book Award in Women's Studies. Fader, Ayala. Mitzvah Girls: Bringing Up the Next Generation of Hasidic Jews in Brooklyn. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009.

MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION. Howard R. Marraro Prize for outstanding scholarìy book on Italian studies. Poggi, Christine. Inventing Futurism: The Art and Politics of Artificial Optimism. Princeton; Princeton University Press, 2009.

MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION. James Russell Lowell Prize for outstanding literary study. Walls, Laura Dassow. The Passage to Cosmos: Alexander von Humboldt and the Shaping of America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY. New York City Book Award. Fader, Ayala. Mitzvah Girls: Bringing Up the Next Generation of Hasidic Jews in Brooklyn. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009.

ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN HISTORIANS. Dartene Clark Hine Prize for best book on African-American women's and gender history. Washington, Margaret. Sojourner Truth's America. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009.

PHI BETA KAPPA. Ralph Waldo Emerson Award for scholarly interpretation of the intellectual or cultural condition of humanity. Reverby, Susan M. Examining Tuskegee:The Infamous Syphilis Study and Its Legacy. Chapel Hill: North Carolina Press, 2009.

SOUTHERN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION. Charles £ Smith Award. Fuchs, Rachel. Contested Paternity: Constructing Families in Modern France. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN HISTORIANS, Frances Richardson KellerSierra Prize for best monograph in the field of history. Fuchs, Rachel. Contested Paternity: Constructing Families in Modern France. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY

Bryant, Rebecca. The Past in Pieces: Belonging in the New Cyprus. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010.

D'Antonio, Patricia. American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority, and the Meaning of Work. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010.

McEnroe, John C. Architecture of Minoan Crete: Constructing Identity in the Aegean Bronze Age. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010.

Nersessian, Nancy J., et al. Science as Psychology: Sense-Making and Identity in Science Practice. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011.

Smith, Suzanne E. To Serve the Living: Funeral Directors and the African American Way of Death, Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010.

ARTS: HISTORY AND CRITICISM

Cromley, Elizabeth Collins. The Food Axis: Cooking, Eating, and the Architecture of American Houses. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010. …

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