Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility with the Integration of Supply Chain Management in Outdoor Apparel Manufacturers in North America and Australia

By Dargusch, Paul; Ward, Adrian | International Journal of Business and Management Science, January 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility with the Integration of Supply Chain Management in Outdoor Apparel Manufacturers in North America and Australia


Dargusch, Paul, Ward, Adrian, International Journal of Business and Management Science


Abstract:

This paper investigates how supply chain management issues feature in the understandings of_corporate social responsibility (CSR) held by managers of outdoor apparel manufacturing firms and whether outdoor apparel manufacturing firms engage in sustainable supply chain management practices. Data were collected using two methods: through semi-structured interviews with nine managers from nine manufacturing firms in the outdoor apparel industry; and through a review of the sustainable supply chain management practices of 27 firms that manufacture and retail outdoor apparel. Interviewed participants articulated their understandings of CSR in terms of three perspectives on sustainability (financial, environmental and social issues). A small number of firms were found to engage in multiple types of sustainable supply chain management practices, and a larger number of firms either did not engage in any sustainable supply chain management practices or used only an industry administered code of practice to guide the way they worked with their suppliers.

Keywords: corporate legitimacy, fair trade, sustainable supply

INTRODUCTION

Apparel manufacturers and retailers often face a number of challenging issues relating to the sustainability of their businesses, including: the assurance of fanstandards of pay and equitable working conditions within their supply chains, which are commonly located in developing countries (Claudio, 2007); growing demand to use more environmentally-sustainable materials (Filus, 2008); pressures to improve water and energy use efficiency; and growing demand for less wasteful packaging (Gupta, 2008). One sector of the apparel industry for which issues of sustainability are of particular concern is the outdoor apparel industry. In 2005, the US retail market for outdoor apparel (including footwear) was valued at over US$33.3 billion (NDP, 2006). A number of well-known brands make up the sector, including, Patagonia, Timberland, Nike, Black Diamond and Mountain Equipment. For many consumers, these brands have a strong affiliation with ideas of sustainability, fair-trade and environmental stewardship (Schnitzspahn, 2008). A survey of outdoor apparel consumers conducted by outdoor apparel retailer Recreation Equipment revealed that the sector was perceived to have a high-level commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR) principles, although the majority of consumers could not name a single initiative to support this claim (BGI, 2007). This finding supports the assertion that consumers generally see the outdoor apparel industry as a clean and green industry, even though it shares many of the same sustainability shortcomings that tend to characterize the apparel industry at large (Alsever, 2007).

Arguably the most publicized of these challenges is how the industry deals with issues related to the social fairness of its supply chains. A report by the US International Trade Commission claims that the majority of firms in the US outdoor apparel industry manufactured most of their products in the developing countries of Asia. The report highlights that this procurement trend was due to the capability of those suppliers to produce cost-competitive high-technology textile goods that were crucial to the outdoor apparel industry's product makeup (USITC, 2007). Such a reliance on supply from developing countries presents a number of important social issues for manufacturers of outdoor apparel. These issues include the provision of clean and safe working conditions within suppliers' factories and the maintenance of fair rates of pay for workers and contractors employed by suppliers. Indeed, such sustainable supply chain management issues have been central themes in highly publicized debates about the ethical behavior of a number of apparel manufacturers, the case of Nike in the 1990s being arguably the most well-known (Spar and Burns, 2000). The North American outdoor industry has responded to stakeholder demands through the introduction of a number of fair labor standards. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility with the Integration of Supply Chain Management in Outdoor Apparel Manufacturers in North America and Australia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.