NAACP Ranks Are Diverse

By Adeboyejo, Betsy | The Crisis, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

NAACP Ranks Are Diverse


Adeboyejo, Betsy, The Crisis


Philip Howell has been a member of the NAACP for nearly two decades. A life member, he can count on one hand how many NAACP chapter meetings he's missed. Howell has logged many hours in getting out the vote efforts, written effective Letters to the Editor, protested the flying of the confederate flag and addressed issues of disparity in healthcare and education. He's served as membership chair, second vice president and first vice president. Just recently he was named president of the Aiken, S.C. chapter.

To his surprise and dismay, his long record of commitment isn't what is getting all of the attention.

"It's because I'm White," Howell acknowledges. "Not all NAACP members are Black. If anybody knows Aiken and knows me, it's no big deal at all. I just want to make the NAACP in Aiken relevant to the community. I'm really humbled they thought enough of me to elect me president."

Howell is the first White president of a NAACP branch in South Carolina. Lonnie Randolph Jr., South Carolina state president for the NAACP, said Howell's election means the NAACP is succeeding in carrying out its mission of ensuring opportunities are made available to all people.

"I'm not startled by his complexion," Randolph says. "He has earned the right to be where he is. He is a dynamic young man. I don't know anybody who works harder than he does."

Howell's election indeed demonstrates the evolving diversity that is the NAACP. In December, for example, the Jackson State University chapter in Mississippi elected a young 30-something White man and in March members of the Worcester branch in Massachusetts elected their first openly gay president.

"We're practicing what we preach," Randolph said. "It's not about the color of your skin; it's what's inside, what we don't see, the commitment to the cause of freedom."

Randolph says for people who think it is unusual for a White person to lead in the organization, they should revisit history.

"I like to take people back to the morning of Feb. 12, 1909. There were 47 White people in that room and 6 African Americans when this organization started."

Howell, a native of San Bernardino, Calif., was drafted by the Army in 1969 and sent to Fort Gordon in Augusta, Ga. Following his time in the Army he decided to stay in the area and bought a dog grooming business. The owner of a schnauzer dog named Annie and a Doxen named Malcolm X, Howell has worked as a dog groomer for 35 years and with a veterinarian hospital for 22 of those years.

Having grown up during the Civil Rights Movement but never allowed to participate, Howell says he's always been drawn to issues of inequality. In 1963, he was 13 years old and watched the March on Washington on TV all day. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

NAACP Ranks Are Diverse
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.