Relationship between ICD-10 Psychosocial Categories and Psychiatric Diagnosis in Israeli Adolescents

By Fennig, Silvana; Apter, Alan et al. | The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences, April 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Relationship between ICD-10 Psychosocial Categories and Psychiatric Diagnosis in Israeli Adolescents


Fennig, Silvana, Apter, Alan, Horesh, Netta, Arzi, Ruth, Zalsman, Gil, Weizman, Avi, Fennig, Shmuel, The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences


ABSTRACT

Aim: The study examined the relationship between psychosocial categories obtained by WHO-developed semistructured interviews (ICD-10 Axis V) and clinical Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents.

Methods: The sample included 71 consecutive patients admitted to an adolescent unit and their mothers. Mothers completed a semi-structured interview derived from the criteria for each psychosocial category (Axis V), and the adolescents were diagnosed by experienced psychiatrists using the Schedule for Affective Disorders for School Age Children (K-SADS-P).

Results: Anorexia nervosa and conduct disorder were associated with a psychosocial category of "abnormal qualities of upbringing," and conduct disorder and schizophrenia were associated with a psychosocial category of "events brought about by the child's own behavior."

Conclusions: The systematic assessment of psychosocial categories add specific information to the validity of the Axis I diagnosis.

INTRODUCTION

The established role of psychosocial stress as a risk factor for psychiatric disorders in adults led to its investigation in the development of child and adolescent mental disorders (1) and to its association in the course of mental disorders and in the response to treatment (2). Research on psychopathology in this age group highlighted the problems of reliability of the different sources of information and how to resolve those differences (3-5). These findings suggested that psychopathology should be approached from a developmental perspective with assessments of family, peer, school, and their environmental relationships, thereby obviating the need for a structured and systematic psychosocial diagnsosis.

In 1990, a work group of the World Health Organization (WHO) specified criteria for abnormal psychosocial situation in a similar fashion to the clinical Axis I psychiatric disorders in the research version of ICD-10 and the DSM-IV (6). The tenth revision of the ICD-10 adopted these recommendations in the form of the new nine-category qualitative classification for children based on previous studies (7). This axis suggests a way to code abnormal psychosocial conditions based on the developmental age of the child and his past history. The categories were chosen based on their ability to validate significant risk factors even if they were not considered a direct etiological factor (8, 9). Clear operational criteria were developed for each category, and two semistructured interviews, one for children and one for their parents, were constructed. The psychosocial categories form the fifth axis of the five-part multiaxial classification of childhood psychiatric disorders (7). We found as part of the present study that all of the psychosocial categories of Axis V were common and relevant to a population of inpatient adolescents and we conclude, based on our findings, that it is possible to make reliable and relevant diagnoses in severely ill adolescents (10).

In the present paper we aimed to further investigate the specific links between the psychiatric diagnosis and the psychosocial categories.

Sarason et al. (11) claim that there is a correlation between specific life events and specific psychiatric disorders. It is widely accepted that depression and mania are associated with life events and the ability to adjust to them. Specific life events like loss, divorce of parents and traumatic events in the parent are associated with higher rates of mood disorders later in life, especially if those events occur during childhood (12, 13). Abnormal family relationship and rearing practices have been related to eating disorders for many years (14). However, when anorexic patients are studied separately from those with other eating disorders the results of controlled studies are conflicting (15). In a recent study women with bulimia nervosa tended to report more troubled childhood expriences than did women from a non-morbid comparison group. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Relationship between ICD-10 Psychosocial Categories and Psychiatric Diagnosis in Israeli Adolescents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.