ICTM 41ST WORLD CONFERENCE - Conference Update

Bulletin of the International Council for Traditional Music, April 2011 | Go to article overview

ICTM 41ST WORLD CONFERENCE - Conference Update


41st World Conference of the ICTM,

13 - 19 July 2011, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada

http://www.mun.ca/ictm2011

Program Committee

Salwa El-Shawan Castelo-Branco (chair, Portugal)

Chao Chi-Fang (Taiwan)

Naila Ceribasic (Croatia)

Robert Chanunhkah (Malawi)

Beverley Diamond (Canada)

Rafael de Menezes Bastos (Brazil)

Janet Sturman (USA)

Stephen Wild (Australia)

Wim van Zanten (The Netherlands)

Program Committee Chair Contact Information:

Salwa El-Shawan Castelo-Branco

Instituto de Etnomusicologia - Centro de Estudos em Música e Dança

Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas

Ave. de Berna 26C

Lisboa 1069-061

Portugal

Email: secb@fcsh.unl.pt

Tel: 351217908300

Fax: 351217908303

Conference Themes

1. Indigenous Modernities

This theme invites presentations that address the impact of modernity on communities of indigenous music/dance cultures in any country or region of the world. How are contemporary genres of popular culture, theatre or film being used by indigenous artists to express issues that concern them or challenges they currently face? What aspects of traditional song and dance knowledge are being either sustained or lost in the late 20th and early 21st century? What factors are contributing to their cultural maintenance, change, or decline? How is the production of media by indigenous musicians controlled, enabled, and invested with meaning? How are new contexts, new collaborations, and new audiences reshaping traditional and contemporary musical practices?

Scholars who submit abstracts for this theme will be aware that the term "indigenous" is often a subject of debate and redefinition. Similarly, "modernity" is a large concept that could include such things as industrial development, media or technological change, globalization, and intercultural exchange as well as deterritorialization and encroachments on indigenous land or lifeways.

2. Cross-cultural Approaches to the Study of the Voice

ICTM plans to share one day with the Phenomenon of Singing Symposium, an international event also taking place in St. John's in July 2011. Because our two conferences will bring together ethnomusicologists, singers, pedagogues and choral directors, some questions are motivated by our potential common interests. How is "the voice" conceptualized-sonically, socially, physically, metaphysically-in local traditions? For over a decade, the world music movement in Western education has advocated the use of non-Western vocal techniques and timbres: Which techniques/timbres have been successfully adopted/adapted and why? How have the uniform expectations and standards of international choral competitions and festivals affected local concepts about singing? How is "vocal health" defined by different cultural groups? Similarly, what are some culturally-specific discourses of vocal pathology and how are they implicated in vocal pedagogy? How are aspects of identity (gender, class, or ethnicity for instance) mapped on to voice types and timbres?

3. Rethinking Ethnomusicology through the Gaze of Movement

For this theme, we borrow the concept of the "gaze" from anthropology and visual art scholarship where the word implies not simply the act of looking, but also assumptions about who looks and from what perspective. To rethink how we might shift ethnomusicology through the gaze of movement then, might imply several different things. It could mean that we start from the perspective of those who "move." How do they perceive the time and space of music? Or it could mean that we consider the musical implications of looking at movement. By starting from the vocabularies, rhythms, and sensations of movement, how might we think differently about music? By considering how movement is naturalized, exoticized, formalized or contextualized, how is our attention to music already framed by these aspects of the visual and tactile? …

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