Urtext of Brahms' Sextets Seeks to Eliminate Historical Errors

By Wilson, Miranda | Strings, September 2011 | Go to article overview

Urtext of Brahms' Sextets Seeks to Eliminate Historical Errors


Wilson, Miranda, Strings


Urtext of Brahms' Sextets Seeks to Eliminate Historical Errors

Editor Christopher Hogwood tackles works by a notorious self-editor

BRAHMS' STRING SEXTETS, Op. 18, in Bi- major (1860), for 2 Violins, 2 Violas, and 2 Violoncellos, and Op. 36 in G major (1864-5), for 2 Violins, 2 Violas, and 2 Violoncellos, are among the composer's most popular chamber works. The Beethovenian style of Opus 18 reveals Brahms's youthful revitalization of Classical structures. Opus 36, one of whose themes famously spells out the name of his erstwhile fiancée, Agathe von Siebold, was written to exorcise his guilt after their doomed love affair.

It's surprising that until now there has been no scholarly edition of the sextets upon which performers could base a historically conscientious interpretation. Editions by Kalmus, International, and others are problematic, with numerous wrong notes and editorial idiosyncrasies. Christopher Hogwood's new Bärenreiter urtext is long awaited - and most welcome.

As Hogwood notes in his preface to the scores, attempting a "definitive" version of any Brahms work is fraught with minefields. Brahms notoriously revised, reworked, and destroyed sketches and drafts for many compositions. Several composer-approved copies of the sextets from Brahms' time exist, including arrangements for piano. To complicate matters further, it was common practice in the 19th century to publish chamber works in parts only - annotations to the manuscript parts didn't always make it into the full score. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Urtext of Brahms' Sextets Seeks to Eliminate Historical Errors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.