Language and LGBT Housing: Making Models That Fit All Communities

By Silver, Joy | Aging Today, July/August 2011 | Go to article overview

Language and LGBT Housing: Making Models That Fit All Communities


Silver, Joy, Aging Today


What language will baby boomers use to describe aging, and how will they accept its challenges? RainbowVision Santa Fe, a community offering active adult, independent, assisted, transitional and respite living services, has been engaged in reexamining and exploring language that adequately describes stages of aging, and the experience of their member residents, since 2004.

RainbowVision Santa Fe opened in June 2006. It was built to offer LGBTQI (Lesbian, Gay, BiSexual, Transgender, Queer and InterSexed) people an opportunity to live in a community, along with straight allies, in what is now called a Community of Living Diversity. This title was identified and developed by former resident John Rowley, a retired Los Alamos, N.M., scientist, one of the A's (straight allies) in LGBTQ I&A. It emerged in a resident member's promotional and marketing workshop luncheon. What was surprising was how member residents experienced and defined the word diversity.

Definitions of Diversity

Members redefined diversity to include professions, former professions, walks of life, age, place-of-origin, culture, family group identification, religion and philosophy. Members thought of diversity as an active state of being rather than a descriptor, and so formulated the concept of Living Diversity. This phrase became the tagline for RainbowVision. Exploring such concepts provides a way to see what this aging LGBT community experience might have to offer the mainstream eldercare industry.

The demographics of RainbowVision Santa Fe break down like this: 52% female to 48% male, and orientation is LGBT at 60% to 40% non-LGBT. There are also a significant number of LGBT people who have chosen RainbowVision to care for their straight loved ones because of its acceptance of differing family structures, which allows for comfortable family gatherings and celebrations.

The LGBTQI population has experienced unique historical circumstances that influence how they age. One is the advent of the 1980s AIDS crisis. Many gay men at RainbowVision Santa Fe have often remarked that they feel like they are the miracles of their generation in that they are alive at all, which demonstrates that end-of- life issues are not necessarily age-related. Because of that, RainbowVision Santa Fe is not age-restricted, and includes those ages 28 through 99.

Age restrictions commonly found in the industry largely have to do with obtaining loans through HUD for those older than age 62 or from banks for projects allowing those older than age 55, as well as with resident preference in terms of living with or near children. Without such restrictions, RainbowVision is able to accept members of various ages who may present with the challenges of MS, lupus, cancer and Parkinson's disease, to name a few. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Language and LGBT Housing: Making Models That Fit All Communities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.