'Nowhere to Room . . . Nobody Told Them': Logistical and Cultural Impediments to Aboriginal Peoples' Participation in Cancer Treatment

By Shahid, Shaouli; Finn, Lizzie et al. | Australian Health Review, May 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

'Nowhere to Room . . . Nobody Told Them': Logistical and Cultural Impediments to Aboriginal Peoples' Participation in Cancer Treatment


Shahid, Shaouli, Finn, Lizzie, Bessarab, Dawn, Thompson, Sandra C., Australian Health Review


Introduction

Death rates for IndigenousA Australians are three times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians,1,2 with markedly higher cancer mortality rates.3-6 Poorer Indigenous cancer outcomes are occurring despite advances in detection and treatment techniques and overall improvements in cancer outcomes in Australia.7 Indigenous Australians are less likely to access cancer screening; are diagnosed at a more advanced stage of cancer; have poorer continuity of care; lower compliance with treatment; and lower five-year survival rates.4,8,9 This situation clearly warrants consideration and appropriate action by both primary healthcare services and cancer treatment services.

Health service access is an important determinant of health outcomes for both preventive care and treatment.10,11 Access to healthcare is particularly difficult in geographically extensive territories like Australia1 where many people need to travel large distances to health centres and services.12,13 Poorer access to cancer detection, screening, treatment and support services for rural and remote people as compared to urban dwellers, is a primary reason for a reduced likelihood of cancer survival.2,14 Thus, poorer cancer outcomes for Indigenous Australians are compounded by the rural and remote residency of over half of Australia's Indigenous people.2,15

This paper utilises information from research undertaken to investigate the experiences and barriers of Aboriginal people in accessing cancer services and treatment inWA.Anexplicit aim of the research was to explore differences in experiences for Aboriginal people based upon their residence in urban, rural or remote settings. Basic infrastructure and logistical problems in accessing hospital-based treatment along with communication issues16 and lack of culturally appropriate service delivery mechanisms were frequently mentioned by the participants. Inevitably, additional problems were reported by those who travelled from rural areas to receive cancer assessment and treatment. This paper focusses on what could be considered as infrastructure necessities for Aboriginal patients on their cancer journey including transport, accommodation, preparation for hospital-based cancer treatment, service affordability and support services. The study outcomes indicated that reconfiguration of cancer care, with a greater emphasis on support in local communities and better coordination with primary healthcare services is necessary to improve Aboriginal patient outcomes.

Methods

Ethics approval

Ethics approval was obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committee of four organisations including the Western Australian Aboriginal Health Information and Ethics Committee. An Aboriginal Reference Group (ARG) consisting of Aboriginal health professionals was established, involved and consulted throughout the study period.

Data collection and analysis

The research design ensured a culturally sensitive research approach by involving and supporting Indigenous people.17 Descriptive qualitative research methods were utilised. Prior to commencement of the interview, steps were taken to ensure an introduction from someone trusted and known by the participant, to build rapport and develop a relationship. Participants were encouraged to tell their story in describing their cancer journey. This mode of data gathering known as 'yarning' is an acceptable means of collecting data, aligning with Indigenous cultural oral traditions offering Indigenous people a voice by applying a nonthreatening research paradigm.18

Thirty in-depth interviews were conducted between March 2006 and September 2007 in Perth (urban) (n = 11) and in one rural (9) and two remote areas (7) of WA. Several patients from other areas of WA who came to Perth for treatment around this time were also interviewed (n = 3). Aboriginal interviewees were adult cancer patients, survivors (14) and family members (16) of people with cancer or people who had died from cancer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'Nowhere to Room . . . Nobody Told Them': Logistical and Cultural Impediments to Aboriginal Peoples' Participation in Cancer Treatment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    New feature

    It is estimated that 1 in 10 people have dyslexia, and in an effort to make Questia easier to use for those people, we have added a new choice of font to the Reader. That font is called OpenDyslexic, and has been designed to help with some of the symptoms of dyslexia. For more information on this font, please visit OpenDyslexic.org.

    To use OpenDyslexic, choose it from the Typeface list in Font settings.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.