Race and the University: A Memoir

By Williams, Jeremy | The Journal of Negro Education, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

Race and the University: A Memoir


Williams, Jeremy, The Journal of Negro Education


Race and the University: A Memoir, by George Henderson. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2010, 272 pp., $24.95, paperback.

The Civil Rights Era can be seen as a time of Blacks moralizing Whites, a time when discontented Blacks led conscientious Whites on a Jeremiad journey toward racial harmony and fraternal love. The story is one of memory of how a smaU coUective of progressives changed the moral consciousness of die University of Oklahoma. Race and the University chronicles Henderson's time spent as a faculty member with OU's Sociology department. At the core, die book is essentiaUy another story of civU rights struggle in higher education and Henderson and other Black students fought bigotry, discrimination, and racism by studying theoretical strategies and tactics. The book reflects the deep pain and resentment still felt by those involved, but also explains die strategies and tactics employed to change discriminatory practices of a racist university.

Most African American coUege students today cannot imagine the early civU rights struggles that paved the way for the many benefits received as a direct result of struggles endured by Black university students and faculty members as well as Whites. With Henderson's memoir we return to a history of systemic racism and overt discrimination in higher education.

Nine chapters cover much of Henderson's chronological story of turmoil and struggle. The otoer chapters merely lay bare toe testimony of Henderson's goal and mission to change toe racial climate of toe university in which he is employed, and toe town in which he Uved. Henderson begins his memoir with a brief history of his humble beginnings, but toe book is not lost in frivolous biography. Henderson is brief and gets to the point about toe business of what is to come. Although he skims over his early Ufe, he does make interesting pivotal moment mentions. The best of toe chapter moves chronologically through undergraduate and graduate school, marriage and onto how he came to accept a full-time professorship at Oklahoma State University. He discusses toe mixed (but mostly racist) reactions of Norman's White community.

Henderson's family settles into toe Norman community and toe OU elite, and immediately confronts the racist administration and discriminatory procedures toat have been embedded deeply in the structure and politics of OU. Henderson becomes "toe new sheriff in town."

Chapter 2 reveals toe development and seasoning processes of Henderson's grassroots activism. He served as a consultant to several Detroit activists, learning much from leaders like Jean Washington, Lena Blevins, and legendary civil rights pioneer, Rosa Parks. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Race and the University: A Memoir
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.