Youth Asset Mapping: Showcasing Youth Empowerment and Positive Youth-Adult Partnerships

By Handy, Deborah J.; Rodgers, Kathleen Boyce et al. | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

Youth Asset Mapping: Showcasing Youth Empowerment and Positive Youth-Adult Partnerships


Handy, Deborah J., Rodgers, Kathleen Boyce, Schwieterman, Tiffany Anne, Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


Youth and adult partners participated in youth asset mapping, a form of action research, to assess community assets and youth involvement opportunities. Qualitative data were analyzed to examine youths' feelings of empowerment and experiences with adult partners. Asset mapping contributed to youth empowerment, especially when adults were engaging and encouraging. Differences between youth and adult cultures presented some barriers to empowerment. Findings suggest that youth-adult partnerships are most beneficial when adults are knowledgeable about youth culture and factors that contribute to positive youth development, have skills for facilitating youth engagement, understand the benefits of youth-adult partnerships, and recognize youth efforts.

What conditions promote the development of empowerment? What kinds of experiences do youth need to increase their sense of empowerment? In this study, we explore these questions with data collected as part of a community empowerment project evaluation. The project engaged high school and adult partners in youth asset mapping. In partnership with adults, high school students collected data to assess community strengths (assets) and identify areas of need to promote positive youth development. Using qualitative data collected from interviews with youth and adult participants, we examined whether empowerment was attained by youth who participated in asset mapping and determined characteristics of adult leaders in this process.

SITES, PARTICIPANTS, AND PROJECTS

Fifty-two students from three high schools participated in mapping assets for youth within their community. Each school differed slightly in the implementation of asset mapping, but the overall tasks and aims included collecting data from within the school or local community to determine available resources that promote positive youth development. For example, youth surveyed peers and adults about perceptions of their community and of youth as contributors or detractors to the community. They assessed job opportunities and places for youth to engage in positive activities within their community. These data were then used to develop strategies to increase awareness about youth needs and implement plans to increase opportunities for youth engagement.

Two schools were recruited by a project coordinator; another site participated at the request of a student who had heard about the asset mapping. The number of students who participated from each school varied from 8 to 35. Because resources and timeframes differed by site, each site implemented youth asset mapping in a slightly different manner; however, each provided youth an opportunity to take leadership roles and learn about their community.

METHOD

The data were collected by researchers through student focus groups, individual interviews, and by reviewing descriptive documents about the project. Focus groups were conducted within two project sites. Individual interviews were conducted by telephone during the second and third years of project implementation. A snowball sampling method was utilized to identify adults who were connected with or exposed to the asset mapping project. Interviewees included former high school students, adult partners, principals, a superintendent, grant writers, community members, and project administrators (e.g., project coordinators, collaborators, and Americorp volunteers who served as links between youth and adults in the community). Students who participated in the interviews and focus groups were primarily female, European American, and in grades 9-12.

The processes of open and axial coding, as outlined by Strauss and Corbin (1991), were used to analyze the data. These processes allowed us to complete thematic content analysis using a constant comparison method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). A number of themes emerged from the data supporting the development of empowerment and reinforcing the literature on youth-adult partnerships. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Youth Asset Mapping: Showcasing Youth Empowerment and Positive Youth-Adult Partnerships
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.