A Multilevel Growth Assessment of the Diffusion of Management Innovation Nested in State Levels: The Case of US Local Economic Development Programs

By Hsieh, Jun Yi | Innovation : Management, Policy & Practice, April 2011 | Go to article overview

A Multilevel Growth Assessment of the Diffusion of Management Innovation Nested in State Levels: The Case of US Local Economic Development Programs


Hsieh, Jun Yi, Innovation : Management, Policy & Practice


ABSTRACT

The practice of local public programs is an interesting topic for the study of the diffusion of management innovation. Based on previous research on the diffusion of innovative policy in state governments, this research employs a panel design to analyse the passage of management innovation related to local economic development programs. Panel data drawn from 1994, 1999, and 2004 USA International City/County Management Association (ICMA) surveys on economic developments of municipal and county governments were used. Using a multilevel growth curve model, the findings indicated that the diffusion of management innovation (e.g., adoption of economic development plans and performance measures) did not spread as expected between and within the localities sampled, even if management innovation has become a widespread practice in federal and state governments. However, our estimates found that the diffusion factors (e.g., internal determinants, learning, and competitiveness) contributed to the adoption of a performance measure and to an economic development plan to retain and attract local businesses and to drive economic growth. Using a panel design (rather than a cross-sectional study) to look at the changes of adoption of management innovation, this research examined the diffusion of policy innovations in local management. State factors are found to have an impact on local practices in the USA.

Keywords: management innovation; local economic development programs; multilevel growth model; policy diffusion

(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)

INTRODUCTION

Public service has always responded to calls for enhancing its efficiency and effectiveness in meeting the citizens' demands. Often such response has been in the form of management innovation. The USA Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) required government agencies to develop strategic plans tied to proposed budgets and performance measures that were then realised by legislation and mandates (Franklin & Long 2003). The GPRA has influenced policy and management practices in both state (Melker & Willoughby 1998) and local governments (Berman et al. 1999; Berman & Wang 2000; Wang 2002; Rivenbark & Kelly 2003; Poister & Streib 2005). The spread of management innovation will most likely diffuse from federal to state governments, from state to local governments, and from one local government to another because of federalism. In particular, it is expected to explain the adoption of strategic plans and performance measures that provide incentive to others to adopt, or create, novel instruments that are useful at local levels.

Local management innovation in this research indicates that the implementation of new management practices that represent a significant departure from current norms. Over time, it has transformed the way many functions and activities work in local governments, what is intended to further organizational goals (e.g., efficiency, effectiveness, quality; Birkinshaw & Mol 2006; Birkinshaw et al. 2008).1 Given the intense budgetary pressures and the ideology of small government, state and local governments in the USA have looked to private management instruments such as strategic planning, performance measures to optimise practices in state governments (e.g., Berry 1994; Poister & Van Slyke 2002; Nicolini & Shambarger 2007; Compin 2008) and local governments (e.g., Poister & Streib 1989; Julnes & Holzer 2001). Strategic plans and performance measures are relatively new innovations to local governments, some scholars found they were not commonly adopted by local governments (e.g., Poister & Streib 1989; Julnes & Holzer 2001; Walker & Boyne 2006).

The above-mentioned efforts indicated the importance of adopting local management innovation, but inappropriate and unconvincing evidences failed to our understanding the extent of their diffusion. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Multilevel Growth Assessment of the Diffusion of Management Innovation Nested in State Levels: The Case of US Local Economic Development Programs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.