Gus Van Sant vs Gus Van Sant

By Berlin, Mike | Out, September 2011 | Go to article overview

Gus Van Sant vs Gus Van Sant


Berlin, Mike, Out


FALL'S BIGGEST FACEOFF

After a relatively quiet three-year period, Gus Vant Sant returns this fall, directing the indie romance film, Restless, and executive producing his first foray into television, Boss, whose season premiere he also directed. They're wildly different projects, but coincidentally (or not?) both center on characters dealing with their looming deaths. Which is for you? Let us help you decide, MIKE BERLIN

BOSS

COPING MECHANISMS

In the cutthroat world of Chicago Mayor Tom Kane (Kelsey Grammer), sickness is ammo for political opponents. That's why Kane conducts his doctor's appointments for his degenerative brain disease in an abandoned warehouse. Denial and secrecy are the key to his survival.

LOCATION, LOCATION

The graying lifelessness of industrial Chicago lodges the show in its trenches of corruption and cynicism. There is little comfort in the dark, cold marble of City Hall, and its hollowness hints at Kane's impending entombment.

HOPELESS ROMANTICS

There is no love here - at least, no love free from resentment, duplicity, and hidden agendas. The real desire is for power. And perhaps for a power-hungry, young upstart politician played by Hellcats' Jeff Hephner. …

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