The Beautiful Minds Campaign Connects Creativity and Brain Health

By Gallagher, Adam; Sherman, Andrea | Aging Today, September/October 2011 | Go to article overview

The Beautiful Minds Campaign Connects Creativity and Brain Health


Gallagher, Adam, Sherman, Andrea, Aging Today


There has been a recent and increased focus on how engaging in creative activities can benefit the aging process. Building on the foundational research of Drs. Robert Butler and Gene Cohen, research from Drs. Tony and Helga Noice, Research Center for Arts and Culture director Joan Jeffri and others has suggested such activities can enhance brain health as well as overall wellness.

In 2001, the late Dr. Gene Cohen conducted the first national longitudinal study on the impact of creativity, aging and well-being. Sponsored in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the study demonstrated the positive link between creativity health promotion and disease prevention effects.

"Arts programs encourage older adults to engage in creative learning activities, which provide participants with a sense of mastery as well as social engagement opportunities in their daily lives," said Dr. Gay Hanna, executive director of the Washington, D.C. -based National Center for Creative Aging (NCCA).

Founded in 2001, the NCCA is dedicated to fostering an understanding of the vital relationship between creative expression and healthy aging and to developing programs that build on this understanding. To this end, the NCCA initiated The Beautiful Minds Campaign, coordinated in partnership with life'sDHA Index of Brain Health (a comprehensive assessment of the nation's brain health, www.lifesdha.com/).

This national campaign celebrates individuals, ages 55 and older, who are keeping their minds beautiful and engaged, and raises awareness of how people can maintain vitality and brain plasticity as they age.

What Is a Beautiful Mind?

Online voters for the 2011 Beautiful Minds Campaign have selected Sue Kelley as the People's Choice Beautiful Mind, in light of life'sDHA criteria for a healthy brain: diet (rich in Omega 3 fatty acids, fruits and vegetables), social engagement, mental engagement and physical activity. While Kelley works hard to keep herself in shape physically (she takes weekly 25-mile bicycle trips), she won primarily because of her commitment to caring for her brain through her love of music, which also keeps her socially engaged.

Already part of a women's choir, Kelley recently started a hand-bell choir with members from her church. The logic required by hand-bell choir teamwork draws from one side of her brain, while playing music uses the other. "This keeps me more musically challenged," says Kelley. "And there is nothing better than being part of the group and making music." Kelley's example demonstrates the vital relationship between creative expression and healthy aging. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Beautiful Minds Campaign Connects Creativity and Brain Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.