Alliances: Re/Envisioning Indigenous-Non-Indigenous Relationships

By Todd, Roy | British Journal of Canadian Studies, July 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Alliances: Re/Envisioning Indigenous-Non-Indigenous Relationships


Todd, Roy, British Journal of Canadian Studies


Politics & Social Sciences Lynne Davis (ed.), Alliances: Re/Envisioning Indigenous-non-Indigenous Relationships (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010), 400 pp. 8 images. Cased. $85. ISBN 978-1- 4426-4023-8. Paper. £23. ISBN 978-1-4426-0997-6.

In recent decades there has been a growth in partnerships between Indigenous and non- Indigenous people in Canada. Public service partnerships in provision of childcare, education, health services and police services have formed one sphere of co-operation, particularly in urban areas. Corporate partnerships have developed in territory where forestry, mining and other resource extraction schemes have involved Indigenous people. Partnerships in another sphere, involving social movements and social action are the focus of this collection of papers. The collection's origin is a project funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council which was designed 'to understand the micro-dynamics of power relationships between Indigenous peoples and social movement organizations and actors' (p. 4).

This book, based upon conference papers from 2006, has four main parts. The three chapters in the first part - all by Indigenous contributors - outline 'possibilities of alliance-building when conceived within Indigenous ontological and epistemological understandings of relationships' (p. 8). The ten chapters of part two, 'From the Front Lines', report experiences from a diverse range of projects across Canada. These include five chapters on land and resource disputes, an account of a project setting up an internet area for dialogue, and a description of action-research on art education.

Part three contains chapters combining theoretical discussion with case-study material but uses concepts and theory in an illustrative rather than explanatory manner. …

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