What's Your Credo?

By Baker, Bud | PM Network, September 2011 | Go to article overview

What's Your Credo?


Baker, Bud, PM Network


Having job candidates outline their personal beliefs about leadership takes some of the mystery out of the hiring process.

Q Three project managers have left our organization in as many years. We're once again looking at a dozen shiny new candidates, but how can we find out what they're really like?

A Companies bring great hopes to the hiring process, persuading themselves they've found the perfect candidate, only to find out otherwise a year later. So how can you minimize surprises? Old standards have a place - résumés, reference checking, background investigations, personality tests. Newer techniques can work, too. A quick Google search can reveal much.

The best hiring outcome I've seen lately happened about 18 months ago - long enough that I can safely attest to its success. John wasn't exacdy new: He'd been an aerospace project manager long ago and had moved hito a sort of senior adviser role. He was approaching retirement when a major project went down in flames, and the company asked him to step in. He agreed and went home and wrote what he called his credo - Latin for / believe - a statement of the things he believed about leadership and project management. Here are some excerpts:

It's been a while since my time as project manager, and quite a number of you have joined our ranks since then. Truth in advertising would require that I disclose these things befare I said "yes" to the job, but this is the best I can do at laying out what I see as my strengths and weaknesses, and also the things I believe in. Do fiel free to run these by the longer-tenure folks here, as they surely have their own take on my leadership traits. But this is my view, and here goes:

* I have no instinct ßr empire building, at all. None. I believe in lean organizations, and I would far rather collaborate with our peers than compete with them. …

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