U.S. Army Posts & Installations

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U.S. Army Posts & Installations


This section includes posts and installations primarily supporting the active Army in the continental United States, Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. Army ammunition plants and Army installations in caretaker or inactive status have been excluded.

Acreages reflect real estate under Department of the Army control fn 2011.

The DSN and commercial telephone numbers listed are for operator assistance.

Data are current as of August 7 and are based on information supplied by each post or installation.

Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 and 21010. Opened 1917, home to more than 70 organizations, including Army Research, Development and Engineering Cmd.; Army Communications-Electronics Life Cycle Management Cmd.; 20th Support Cmd. (CBRNE); Army Public Health Cmd.; Army Developmental Test Cmd.; 22nd Chemical Battafion; CBRNE Analytical and Remediation Activity; Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Cmd.; Army Research Laboratory (Aberdeen site); Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense; Aberdeen Test Center; Program Executive Office for Command, Control and Communications (Tactical); Chemical Material Agency; Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity; Civilian Human Resources Agency-Northeast; Civilian Personnel Advisory Center; Army Evaluation Center; 2,061 mil., 11,631 civ. (including nonappropriated-fund employees), 4,281 contractors, 450 other personnel; 72,229 acres, 35 miles northeast of Baltimore. DSN: 298-5201; (410)278-5201.

Anniston Army Depot, AL 36201-4199. Opened 1941; repairs and retrofits combat tracked vehicles, artillery and small arms; receives and stores general supplies, ammunition, missiles, small arms and strategic materiel; 59 mil., 6,825 civ. (including tenants and contractors); 15,000 acres adjacent to Pelham Range, 10 miles west of Anniston. DSN: 571-1 110; (256) 235-7501 .

Fort A.P. HIII, VA 22427. Opened 1941; named for LTG Ambrose Powell Hill, CSA; winner 2008 Army Communities of Excellence Award; 76,000-acre regional training center used for active and reserve component training of all service branches and federal agencies; 27,000-acre live-fire range complex; 1,661 mil. and civ, 227 reserve components. DSN: 578-8760; (804) 633-8760.

Fort Belvolr, VA 22060. An Army property since 1912; named for the manor house of COL William Fairfax, 1736-1741, the ruins of which remain on the garrison; today it is home to 51,000 soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and Department of Defense civilians who are committed to the work of America's defense and to supporting Fort BeIvOJr1S expanding rote as a strategic sustaining base for America's armed forces. The garrison's mission is to provide intelligence, logistical and administrative support to more than 1 60 tenant and satellite organizations; major tenants include National Geospatial- Intelligence Agency, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, DeWitt Army Community Hospital, Defense Logistics Agency; U.S. Cyber Command; Army Management Staff; Defense Contract Audit Agency; Washington Headquarter Services; Defense Threat Reduction Agency; Defense Acquisition University; U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Cmd.; Defense Intelligence Agency; Missile Defense Agency; Night-Vision and Electronics Sensors Directorate; 29th Inf. Div. of the Virginia Army National Guard; approx. 9,000 mil., 42,000 civ. (including tenante and DoD contractors); 6,656 acres, 1 1 miles southwest of Alexandria and 17 miles southwest of Washington, D.C. Home to Davison Army Airfield; controls four noncontiguous properties that include the Mark Center in Alexandria, Oie Fort Belvoir North Area in Springfield, Radio Tower in Tyson's Corner, and Rivanna Station near Charlottesville. DSN: 685-2052; (703) 805-5001.

Fort Benning, GA 31905. Established 1918; named after BG Henry L Benning, CSA; home of Maneuver Center of Excellence; Army Marksmanship Unit; 3rd Bde., 3rd Inf. Div.; Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation; 75th Ranger Rgf. …

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