Advocating for the Emotional Well-Being of Our Nation's Youth

By Forcade, Michael C. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, October 2011 | Go to article overview

Advocating for the Emotional Well-Being of Our Nation's Youth


Forcade, Michael C., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


When you talk to someone from Philadelphia, you quickly get a picture of intense civic pride. Although the city has played a significant role in the history of our country, other eastern seaboard cities seem to get more attention. That does not deter the citizens of Philadelphia from feeling their city is just as great. Indeed, Philadelphia is located in a very central location and more easily accessed than the other major cities. Nothing on the list of what makes a city great is missing in Philadelphia. The city is resplendent with culture, arts, music, sports, commerce, entertainment, shopping, and whatever else you need for fun. NASP is returning to the City of Brotherly Love for the first time since 1984. And I can assure you from my visit in April for the planning conference that this will be a great venue for our annual convention.

Our headquarters hotels are located right in the middle of it all in Center City (downtown to us Midwesterners). Everything the city has to offer is only steps from the hotels. The transit system is easy to navigate whether you are arriving by plane or train, or just trying to move around to see all the historic sites. We found plenty of entertainment and fine food and drink within walking distance. I was easily able to map one of my early morning runs to the Art Museum for a "Rocky" reprise. Be sure to check the "Attractions" featured on page 29 for more information from our local team. I promise all my NASP colleagues that you will find much to enjoy in Philadelphia during any free time you can squeeze in around an outstanding professional development program we have planned for you.

CONVENTION SCHEDULE PACKED WITH GOODIES AGAIN

The theme for the 2012 Philadelphia convention is "Advocating for the Emotional Well-Being of Our Nation's Youth." We will again be able to offer registration and packet pick-up on Monday evening from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. As usual, the convention will be in full swing starting Tuesday mid-morning. In addition, we have moved the Welcome Orientation to 8:00 a.m. to provide an overview of all the convention has to offer. All professional development activities will end late Friday afternoon so that Saturday can be devoted to leadership meetings (or the beginning of your tourism).

REGISTER EARLY AND SAVE

NASP remains committed to making the convention as affordable as possible, despite the fact that our costs will be significantly higher this year. With this in mind, we have introduced a new early registration fee that is even lower than the preconvention registration fee (that is lower than the full registration fee). Online registration opens October 3, 2011. Register by November 16, 2011 to get the lowest possible rate. Register by October 26, 2011 and also be entered to win one of six Early Bird Registration prizes. The Grand Prize includes four hotel nights and a convention registration fee reimbursement.

Another good reason to register early is that you must register for the convention before reserving your room at one of the three convention hotels at the convention rate. Once you register for the convention, you will receive a confirmation that includes instructions for obtaining hotel reservations through our housing bureau This process is designed to ensure ample availability of hotel rooms in the blocks NASP has in the official convention hotels. You will want to be sure to do this as the room rates are unbelievably low. Complete information about convention and hotel registration is available online at www.nasponline .org/conventions.

BEST PRACTICE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

By now, your convention Preliminary Program should have arrived and you may have noticed our continuing effort to emphasize Web resources over paper. NASP's green movement is designed to save trees (and member resources). Plus, we recognize that many more of you out there can access our information from almost anywhere via your hand held devices. …

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