Idea in Practice

By Klotz, Mary Beth | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, September 2011 | Go to article overview

Idea in Practice


Klotz, Mary Beth, National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


Delegate Assembly Adopts Four Position Statements

NASP's Delegate Assembly met in July and voted to adopt revisions to four existing position statements: Identification of Students With Specific Learning Disabilities; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Youth; anàSupervision in School Psychology. Position statements represent the official policy of NASP and are written by workgroups and approved by the Delegate Assembly. They are routinely revised every 7 years, although occasionally a position statement is revised on a shorter cycle, if warranted. They are excellent advocacy tools for school psychologists to use as they work to reform policy and practice at the state and local levels. Position statements are posted on the NASP website at http://www.nasponline .org/about_nasp/position_paper.aspx.

Focus on Learning Disabilities

The National Center for Learning Disabilitiesrecentiyreleasedthenewreport,State of Learning Disabilities: Facts, Trends and Indicators, a national and state-by-state snapshot of learning disabilities (LD) in the United States and their impact on the ability of students and adults to achieve educational success and employment. The report clarifies what an LD is and explains the common misperceptions associated with LD. In light of the fact that 2.5 million students with LD spend the majority of their school day in the general classroom, this report provides important information for policy makers and the public as Congress considers changes to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). To read the report, visithttp://www.ncld.org/state-of-ld-20ii.

School Discipline, Student Success, and Juvenile Justice Involvement

The Council of State Governments Justice Center and the Public Policy Research Institute at Texas A&M University have released a longitudinal study of nearly 1 million Texaspublic secondary school students, followed from 7th through 12th grades. Education data were matched to juvenile justice data to provide information on the "school to prison" pipeline effect. The findings confirm what has long been reported in school psychology literature: that use of suspension and expulsion are widespread, and that certain groups of students are more vulnerable to exclusionary discipline practices than others. More than half of all secondary students had been suspended or expelled, and 15% of students were suspended or expelled 11 times or more. The study also found that students who were suspended or expelled, particularly those who were repeatedly disciplined, were more likely to repeat a grade, not graduate, or become involved in the juvenile justice system. Another important finding from the study was that African American students (particularly males) were more likely to experience exclusionary discipline practices than students of other races. …

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