Monument Lane

By Carey, Leo | The New Yorker, November 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Monument Lane


Carey, Leo, The New Yorker


Lined with ho-hum cafes, shops, and remnants of St. Vincent's hospital, Greenwich Avenue always seems more dishevelled than the ultra-gentrified precincts to its west. But before the Revolutionary War, when most of the area was still fields, part of the street led to a monument honoring General James Wolfe and his victory over the Quebecois, and was known as Monument Lane. The restaurateur Josh Frum has spun this historical perspective into a kind of theme for the new restaurant he opened in April. One wall is dominated by a reproduction of Bernard Ratzer's 1767 map of New York; on another is a Betsy Ross American flag, an eighteenth-century Union Jack, and a Dutch flag. Tables made from salvaged antique doors have a weather-beaten patina, and lights above the bar rest on a sleigh-like wooden pig carrier from a meatpacking plant. Ironically enough, Frum's historical efforts were opposed by the Historic Districts Council, which hoped to preserve the metal Art Moderne facade of the previous tenant, a Caribbean diner.

So much for the history lesson; how's the food? Early reviews were gently deprecating, and the original chef, an alumnus of Picholine, soon left. On a visit a month ago, the impression was of an establishment treading water. The original menu had been retained, and the food was neither good nor bad. Dishes sounded better on the menu than they appeared on the plate. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Monument Lane
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.