India and the Indianness of Christianity: Essays on Understanding-Historical, Theological, and Biographical-In Honour of Robert Eric Frykenberg

By Muthuraj, Joseph G. | Anglican and Episcopal History, September 2011 | Go to article overview

India and the Indianness of Christianity: Essays on Understanding-Historical, Theological, and Biographical-In Honour of Robert Eric Frykenberg


Muthuraj, Joseph G., Anglican and Episcopal History


India and the Indianness of Christianity: Essays on Understanding-Historical, Theological, and Biographical-in Honour of Robert Eric Frykenberg. Edited by Richard Fox Young. (Grand Rapids: W. B. Eerdmanns, 2009. Pp. xi, 283. $45.00.)

Robert Eric Frykenberg is a household name among Indian students of the history of mission. He has made an indelible mark on Indian Christianity with his notewortiiy publications, which are classed alongside the works of Stephen Neill. But, unlike Neill, Frykenberg brought a new dimension to history; to bring to light those who are stuck, like sediments, at the bottom side of history.

India and the Indianness of Christianity, edited by Richard Young, is a collection of essays in honor of Frykenberg, by scholars of the history of church and mission in India and South Asia. Daniel Jeyaraj narrates Tranquebar mission history highlighting die intensive missionary activities from the Indian catechists of the eighteenth century. Brian Stanley focuses on the life and contributions of Henry Martyn (1781-1812) by seeking to redeem Martyn 's image from the hagiographical and by shedding light on the complex side of his character. On missionary portrayals of Hinduism of the nineteenth century, Geoffrey Oddie argues that Indian pundits (scholars) had an enormous influence in reaffirming, modifying, and changing the missionary perceptions. M. Bergunder explores the intra-confessional proselytism happening among the south Indian Christian communities. J. B. Carmen's longtime occupation with the interpretation of Hindu philosophy and religions, particularly the theology of Ramanuja (1017-1137?), calls for serious engagement to bring about East-West understanding. Wilbert Shenk seeks to show how "ancient churches" such as Syrian Christians in India were experiencing change and revival as the result of Protestant Christian mission work in the nineteenth century. There are two articles on north Indian history: One on the Kherwar movement among the Santal tribals, and one on nineteenth-century Christianity in Agra centering on Abdul Masih (1769-1927), a convert from Islam.

The promises the title offers us, namely, to provide readers with a taste of India and Indianness, are realized from western sources available in western academia. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

India and the Indianness of Christianity: Essays on Understanding-Historical, Theological, and Biographical-In Honour of Robert Eric Frykenberg
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.