Leveraging GARP to Ensure Employee Engagement

By Whan, Charity | Information Management, November/December 2011 | Go to article overview

Leveraging GARP to Ensure Employee Engagement


Whan, Charity, Information Management


With the growing need to manage information and knowledge correctly, best practices in information management are no longer key items for discussion among only records and information management (RIM) professionals.

Every employee now has the responsibility to understand and comply with the principles of recordkeeping that allow the organization to adequately facilitate and sustain day-today operations, consistently remain compliant with applicable laws and regulations, and effectively understand what it has done in the past so it can make better choices for its future. Records are vital when these types of decisions are being made, but there is something that is even more critical - the people that make them.

Employees are the most important factor in whether an organization succeeds or fails. The ability of any single employee to have an impact on an organization does not stop at decisions made by a C-level executive, but continues on down through the very fibers that make it up - the entry-level clerks, the front-line managers, and the full-time and part-time support staff.

Taking this into consideration, the question for many organizations has been how they can attract and maintain employees who are loyal and dedicated to the sustainability of not just their positions, but of the organization itself.

Employee Engagement Is Key

The answer for many has been to improve employee engagement. In the simplest of terms, employee engagement is the extent to which employees believe in the mission, purpose, and values of an organization and demonstrate that commitment through their actions toward and attitudes about their employer and customers.

An organization has high employee engagement when employees' statements, conversations, and decisions reflect a natural enthusiasm for the organization, co-workers, and its products or services. Intentionally instilling a "natural enthusiasm" in an employee may not seem like a natural process at all, but research has shown that if certain conditions are in place, employee engagement is not only possible, but highly profitable.

Ensuring employee engagement requires a total approach. Every aspect of an organization's processes and operations has to be supportive and have an encouraging effect. The starting point for any organization is to nail down the basics. The organization must have three things:

1. A high-quality product or service that employees can support with confidence

2. Adequate delivery systems that ensure commitments made to customers are easily met by employees

3. Solid policies and practices, including employee evaluation and recognition systems that are honest, straight-forward, and carried out with dignity

Arriving at this point can be difficult, but the challenge of success can be overcome easily when there is a strategic foundation on which to build.

Gain Leverage Using GARP®

In laying this foundation, organizations that have strong RIM programs have an advantage over those that don't because they are likely implementing the Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles" (GARP'1) released by ARMA International in February 2009.

These principles, which are based on years of un-codified records best practices, were created to assist organizations in implementing effective records systems and programs. Together, the eight GARP* principles - accountability, transparency, integrity, protection, compliance, availability, retention, and disposition - set a standard of conduct deemed to represent sound information governance policy and practice. (See www.arma. org/garp to read the principles and their annotations.)

Use the GARP® In formation Governance Maturity Model as a Framework

In 2010, ARMA International followed the release of GARP® with the GARPft Information Governance Maturity Model (GARP* Maturity Model). Information governance is often a complicated concept, but at its core, it includes the processes, roles, standards, and metrics that ensure the effective and efficient use of information. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Leveraging GARP to Ensure Employee Engagement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.