Diversified Technical Systems

Army, December 2011 | Go to article overview

Diversified Technical Systems


AUSA Sustaining Member Profile

Corporate Structure- Private. Founded: 1990. Headquarters: 909 Electric Avenue, Suite 206, Seal Beach, CA 90740. Telephone: 562493-0158. Web site: www.dtsweb.com/.

Based in Southern California, Diversified Technical Systems (DTS) is the leading manufacturer of data-acquisition recorders and sensors for high-shock testing. The company's approach of combining core engineering expertise with ingenuity has led to a stream of successes including vehicle black box recorders and a series of combat helmet recorders procured by the U.S. military. For more than 21 years, DTS data recorders and sensors have pushed the technological boundaries to measure human injury in extreme test environments.

"The goal is to advance soldier survivability systems," says Stephen Pruitt, president, cofoimder and disciplined crash-test engineer. "In a blast event, energy attenuation is the key to preventing injury or death. Whether it is cars, tanks, helmets or helicopters, companies want to know how to prevent injuries and save lives. The bottom line iS: They trust DTS equipment to collect that data."

Decisions for risk assessment and product development have always been based on analyzing available data, but when the data is from a 5,000-g improvised explosive device detonated only milliseconds before the test article is destroyed, it's more than a data-acquisition exercise; it is a mission-critical test. The same "no second chance" applies to collecting long-term field data from personnel and vehicles deployed for active duty.

As technology progresses and test requirements become even more rigorous, DTS products mirror the evolution of most electronics: Make it smaller, faster and better performing. The result: the ability to gather significant amounts of field data as mil as reliable data from even the most destructive testing such as crash, blast or hard target. In turn, this has ted to significant strides in both governmental safety regulations and manufacturers' self-imposed safety measures, affecting everything from seat belts and sports gear to space capsules.

Soldier Black Box

The U.S. military's next-generation data recorders are now in service on today's battlefield. Engineered, assembleo and relentlessly tested in the United States, these black box recorders have moved from the cockpit to personal systems capable of monitoring a soldier for up to six months on a single lithium battery. According to medical professionals, combat-related traumatic brain injuries nave become the signature injury of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Since 2008, more than 7,000 helmets with "smart sensors" designed by DTS have been fielded by the U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps. The smart sensor is a BAE Systems contract officially titled the Headboroe Energy Analysis and Diagnostic System (HEADS). …

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