Why Some Doctor Groups Favor No-Cause Terminations

Medical Economics, January 12, 1998 | Go to article overview

Why Some Doctor Groups Favor No-Cause Terminations


None of the state due-process laws apply to medical groups and IPAs that take fullrisk or full-professional-risk capitation from health plans. And that's only fair, say their administrators, because the groups and IPAs can't survive if their ability to control costs is restricted.

But a voluntary agreement between the Colorado Medical Society and the state HMO association does cover risk-taking organizations. And the Potvin court decision in California, which punched a hole in health plans' contractual right to terminate doctors without cause, could be interpreted as covering groups and IPAs. too.

This is a critical issue in California, where IPAs deselect far more physicians than HMOs do. In the past, says pediatrician and allergist Brian Greenberg of Tarzana. Calif., IPAs usually deselected physicians either for overutilization or for deficiencies of care. Rather than face a lawsuit. the organizations tended to drop doctors without cause, just as HMOs do.

Medical groups, which often contract with outside specialists, typically stop referring to those they deem cost-inefficient or procedurehappy. But some groups are owned by a minority of their physicians, which makes the rest of them independent contractors. Those practices face the same quandary as IPAs do when it comes to terminating physicians.

Since these trends are starting to spread beyond California, it's not surprising that the American Medical Group Association and two national IPA associations have filed an amicus curiae letter in the appeal of the Potvin ruling to the California Supreme Court. They want the court either to nullify Potvin or clarify whether it covers IPAs and groups. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Why Some Doctor Groups Favor No-Cause Terminations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.