Dreamers of a New Day

By Morris, Brian | Anarchist Studies, July 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Dreamers of a New Day


Morris, Brian, Anarchist Studies


Sheila Rowbotham, Dreamers of a New Day London: Verso: 2010 Hbk: 978-1844677030, £11; Pbk 978-1 8446761 32, £17.95

Author of a recent splendid biography of Edward Carpenter (2008), Sheila Rowbotham is a well-known socialist historian and feminist. Her books Women, Resistance and Revolution (1972) and Hidden from History (1973) were pioneer studies of women's liberation, in outlining their struggles against social oppression and gender inequalities. Dreamers of a New Day is her most recent book. Like Rowbotham's earlier historical studies, it is a work of fine scholarship, wellresearched, lucidly written, and intellectually engaging.

The book is focused on Britain and the United States, and covers the period from around 1880 to the beginning of the First World War. This was, of course, a period of immense social change, with the resurgence of industrial capitalism - reflected in the growth of urban slums, the advent of large-scale corporations, mass production and sweated labour, and the widespread movement of the human population - particularly immigration into the United States.

Dreamers of a New Day essentially details the response of women across the political spectrum to these social changes, and the sense that they had that a new way of life was possible. It thus brings together a mass of interesting material on, for example, the following: birth control campaigns; the efforts of women to democratize personal relationships and thus explore new forms of sexuality; the links between women's efforts at emancipation and the socialist movement, particularly the role of women in the trade unions and their own labour organizations, including the suffragettes. It is thus a very wide-ranging text, discussing numerous women's organizations and the many social issues that involved women around the turn of the twentieth century. It carries the subtitle 'Women who invented the twentieth century', for many of the issues raised by these 'rebel women', as Rowbotham describes them, have now become part of everyday life. Indeed, she suggests that women in the early years of the twentieth century had transformed many of the conditions of their own lives, decades before the intellectuals of the 1960s discovered 'everyday life' as an arena for radical politics.

I have only two misgivings with regard to this valuable book. The first is that Rowbotham often, somewhat disconcertingly, flips back and forth in the text between Britain and America. The second is that there is no real introduction to the contents of the book - for the introduction is a rather breathless sweep over numerous issues, woman's organizations and countless women rebels and reformers - Rowbotham mentioning (but often no more than mentioning) within the space of nine pages, no less than forty-one different women. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dreamers of a New Day
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.