Holistic Management Systems

By Wilson, J. G. | Management Services, July 1994 | Go to article overview

Holistic Management Systems


Wilson, J. G., Management Services


Managers are required to manage and to manage effectively they have to be in control. The concept of Holistic Management Systems (HMS) is to build upon the strengths of management by training them to learn to succeed. This is especially useful for those managers who need to extend and integrate their business and behavioural skills and to develop the perspective required for managing complex and changing organisations.

The most effective training is best achieved when carried out in conjunction with the organisation and tuned to their specific requirements.

Modern management should have the theories, techniques and tools which equip them to recognise the functional relationships between the parts and the whole, generating the diagnostic ability to produce continuous incremental improvement within a controlled environment of benchmarked standards. Managers have to manage realistically.

The marketplace is subject to many market forces, it is not in a state of equilibrium, nor even as many suggest is it organic, it is in a state of dynamic chaos.

The managers' prime function is to produce a strategy to deal with the chaotic process, as well as handling the problems and solving the everyday tasks in order to achieve the satisfaction of customer needs.

The focus of HMS is upon developing competences required for leading strategic change and enhancing the understanding of competition.

Holistics' is a diagnostic approach to the management of an organisation that guarantees success. How? -- by putting the management in control and by emphasising the functional relationships between the organisation's parts and the whole.

MAJOR BENEFITS

Organisations that involve themselves in this diagnostic approach will develop:

A management more capable of handling problems, every day tasks and addressing changes in market forces.

A workforce with better teamwork, improved communications and greater responsiveness.

An organisation with increased capabilities and the ability to identify opportunities and take advantage of them.

The holistic management system is a method of working with part of an organisation for the benefit of the whole company.

The appropriate personnel are led through the analysis of the problem to the development of beneficial solutions. It is a management tool for proactively understanding one's own business in terms of customer needs, customer care and customer satisfactions, focusing continuous improvements on the key areas where competitive impact will be greatest.

The system helps to answer the question 'how do we compare' and allows decisions to be based upon facts, not intuition. The array of diagnostic techniques and tools available will depend upon the requirement of the specific organisation but could for example cover the following:

BENCHMARKING:

TECHNOLOGY

transference points resistance

MOTIVATION

management activity communications customer care health and safety

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

plan, control, exploitation research groups

COMPETITIVE PRESSURES

short term (price-elasticity) long term

MANUFACTURING

synchronising new skills exploiting new technology

MARKETING

competition (market share) changes (technological/fashion) consumer behaviour demographics, sociological and global environmental/economic

PERSONNEL PLANNING

evaluation, assessment, appraisal, monitoring, training, staff development and rewards

MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEMS

purchasing (inventory/stocks) production scheduling quality maintenance manufacturing overhead value analysis structured systems analysis and design method financial

SYSTEMS LOGISTICS

PCs/Mainframe/network delivery performance supply chain stock turnover

The system measures against the best -- not the previous year's performance. …

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