Stockholm Syndrome

By Moriceau, Jean-Luc | Tamara Journal of Critical Organisation Inquiry, March-June 2011 | Go to article overview

Stockholm Syndrome


Moriceau, Jean-Luc, Tamara Journal of Critical Organisation Inquiry


I love you my firm... unconditionally, exclusively and dependently

Don't leave me now, I'll be lonely and lost, if I can't count in your

checking accounts

You chatted me up, with your charts and checks, with the sweet, sweat

smell of your shops

Now I depend on the maze of your gaze; I make my case, for the days of

haze-based raises

When you ciy for your P&L, when you pay so much attention to my time

and motions

Emotion moves me and I sacrifice seeing my family, I move away from

my life

You stole me from my friends, my fights, my TV, you stole me from my

roots, my head, my conscience

I'm kinda kidnapped, body and soul, I think I'm suffering from Stockholm

syndrome

Since I penetrated through your back door, I feel like a real, tattooed man

I savour the stress and pressure as you whip me wild with your value

chains

Your true and cruel accountability eyes up my good shapes, so I have to

make good, perform till late

With the sex appeal of your SAP, you have reengineered my plastic body

I'm your puppet, your baby doll, I have to be pretty and I have to shut up

The shout out loud of your sense-making has become for me music of

sense thrilling

I thought of myself as an XXL, you downsized me to a bare SM

I wanna feel your stroke, under my skin, I think I'm suffering from

Stockholm syndrome

To bliss your shareholders, you blow jobs away, but "ceci n'est pas une

pipe", it's a real distress

I know you could fire all, you the Ripper, and that you beat around the

Bush, you the Stripper

But when I'm threatened to fall, to dive into hopelessness, homelessness,

it's not to sink in a pink boink

So whatever is good for you is good for me, but keep me, cage me close in

your money trap. …

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