B.C. Polygamous Leader Wants Congregation Assessment to Save on His Taxes: B.C. Polygamous Leader Asks for Tax Change

By Keller, James | The Canadian Press, January 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

B.C. Polygamous Leader Wants Congregation Assessment to Save on His Taxes: B.C. Polygamous Leader Asks for Tax Change


Keller, James, The Canadian Press


VANCOUVER - The leader of a polygamous commune in southeastern British Columbia took the stand Monday at a trial that's attempting to define his obscure community.

Hundreds of thousands of dollars depend on whether Winston Blackmore can convince a tax court judge that Bountiful, B.C., is a religious congregation deserving of special status.

The trial is expected to place the community under an unprecedented spotlight, with Blackmore and other residents called to testify about life in Bountiful, from how its businesses and land are structured to the organization and beliefs of its religion.

Blackmore spoke quietly as he described his own financial situation and recalled the history of the community. Bountiful was founded just south of Creston, B.C., near the U.S. border in the 1950s, just a few years before Blackmore was born.

While the mainstream Mormon church renounced polygamy more than a century ago, Blackmore insisted he follows the church's teachings.

"My religion has always been the religion of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints," said Blackmore, wearing a dark suit in the witness box.

"I believe in the Bible. I believe in the Book of Mormon."

Bountiful residents follow the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, or FLDS, a U.S.-based offshoot of the Mormon church that still holds polygamy as a tenant of the faith.

The community split in 2002, with half of the community continuing to follow the FLDS and the other half following Blackmore.

In court documents, Blackmore has insisted his followers make up a bona fide religious congregation in which resources are shared and everyone works to benefit the entire community. He argued that means any income generated by Bountiful's businesses should be spread over the community's residents rather than considered his personal income.

Ottawa says tax laws governing religious congregations were designed for truly closed communes such as Hutterite colonies, where residents have no property or possessions of their own and work exclusively for the betterment of their community.

Federal government lawyers insist Bountiful does not fit that definition, and have re-assessed Blackmore's tax filings to add $1.5 million in additional income from 2000 to 2004 and in 2006.

The income is connected to J.R. Blackmore and Sons Ltd., the community's business arm that is involved in logging, fence-post manufacturing and farming in B.C., Alberta and Idaho. Blackmore holds a 40-per-cent stake in the company.

Federal government lawyer Lynn Burch told court that Bountiful isn't a congregation as defined by the tax law.

Burch said the law requires members of such congregations to belong to a formal religious organization and to live and work together in a community that does not permit residents to own property or land. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

B.C. Polygamous Leader Wants Congregation Assessment to Save on His Taxes: B.C. Polygamous Leader Asks for Tax Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.