Practice and Research in Career Counseling and Development-2010

By Creager, Marie F. Shoffner | Career Development Quarterly, December 2011 | Go to article overview

Practice and Research in Career Counseling and Development-2010


Creager, Marie F. Shoffner, Career Development Quarterly


This review of the 2010 career counseling and development research presents the breadth and depth of topics published in the field ranging from children's conceptions of career to employee burnout. The review covers topics in the career literature on professional issues, career theory and concepts, career development, the world of work, career assessment and technology, and career interventions. The author summarizes the 2010 research to provide information and direction to career practitioners, theorists, and researchers.

The incredible amount of reading, organizing, synthesizing, and integrating involved in an annual review is difficult to imagine before the fact and even more challenging to adequately explain after completion. The time and effort spent completing this review was gready rewarded by the quality of the articles I read and by all I learned from the 2010 research literature in career counseling and development.

For this review, I chose, as have previous annual review authors of The Career Development Quarterly (CDQ) , to focus on the four primary U. S. -based career journals: CDQ, the Journal of Career Assessment, the Journal of Career Development, and the Journal of Vocational Behavior. I identified all articles that seemed relevant in the tables of contents for many of the American Counseling Association (ACA) division journals (i.e., Adultspan, Journal of College Counseling, Journal of Counseling & Development, Journal of Employment Counseling [JEC], Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, and Professional School Counseling), for the American Psychological Association (APA) journals most likely to contain research articles in the career field (i.e., Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Counseling Psychology, and The Counseling Psychologist), and for several international journals (i.e., Australian Journal of Career Development, British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, and International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance).

After identifying and downloading more than 350 articles, I read the articles in the four primary career journals and an additional 70 to 100 articles. I then had the enormously challenging task of choosing the articles most representative of the breadth and depth of topics addressed in this year's research. In the process, I may have omitted a critical piece of research in an area new to me or included articles that others may have excluded. Nonetheless, I hope that I have covered the major content areas and the key research in those areas.

After choosing the articles to include in this review, I organized the review according to examples of previous annual reviews. I have included primary sections on professional issues, career theory and concepts, career development, the world of work, career assessment and technology, and career interventions. Within each of these broader categories, I have included subsections with as much breadth as seemed appropriate and synthesized the findings from that group of articles to provide focus for career practice. I have included international research in appropriate topical sections and identified sample nationality in my descriptions. In addition, I have included a Summary and Conclusion section for each of the primary sections.

The purpose of my review is to provide the reader with a summarization of the career research of 2010, its primary implications, and some thoughts for practice based on this research. By far the most instructive and immediately practical article written during 2010 was Paul Härtung 's excellent 2009 annual review (Härtung).

Professional Issues

There were many research and conceptual articles in 2010 that focused on issues of professional importance to those in the fields of career development and counseling. A large number of these were related to diversity and multicultural aspects of career development. …

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