From New York to Asia, Lin Is an NBA Sensation

By Mahoney, Brian | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, February 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

From New York to Asia, Lin Is an NBA Sensation


Mahoney, Brian, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


NEW YORK >> Comparisons to the likes Shaquille O'Neal and LeBron James are one thing, but nothing reflects Jeremy Lin's amazing impact on the NBA this season better than the fact that the New York Knicks are now being talked about as championship contenders.

Before Lin's extraordinary first week as a starter, the Knicks were 40-1 with bookmakers and being booed by their notoriously demanding fans. Five games later, they're 18-1 with Bovada.lv and the hype-o-meter is into the red zone, mostly thanks to the Taiwanese-American.

The undrafted player from Harvard made a 3-pointer with half a second left Tuesday to give the Knicks a 90-87 victory at Toronto. The Knicks returned home Wednesday and beat Sacramento, notching a seventh straight victory to even their wins and losses after an 8-15 start.

Lin joined the rotation only then, starting the last five games, so comparisons with Michael Jordan, Shaq or LeBron are more than a touch premature. But the Knicks have seen enough to believe this ride may last a while longer.

"I don't know when there's an ending. Maybe there won't," coach Mike D'Antoni said.

Lin's story has blown straight past the New York sports pages and all their cute headlines like "Va-Lin-tine's Day," all the way to the other side of the world, where he's been "kind of like the great Asian hope," said Orin Starn, professor and chair of Cultural Anthropology at Duke.

Lin has done wonders for shares of Madison Square Garden Inc., the company that owns the Knicks, the Garden and the namesake sports network. The stock has surged 9 percent since Lin began his heroics Feb. 4, reaching an all-time high of $33.18 earlier this week before retreating slightly to close at $31.91 Wednesday.

"Rangers and Knicks fans do tend to buy the stock when the teams are doing well," said Miller Tabak analyst David Joyce.

And Linsanity has reached America's most powerful basketball fan, with President Barack Obama talking about Lin's winner Wednesday.

White House spokesman Jay Carney said Lin was "just a great story, and the president was saying as much this morning."

Lin arrived in New York in December with no guarantee he would last more than a few weeks. Already cut by Golden State and Houston this season, he was so hesitant to get comfortable in his new home that he refused to even get his own.

Instead, he slept at his brother's place in the city, and crashed on teammate Landry Fields' couch the night before his breakout game against New Jersey on Feb. 4.

Even an Ivy League education couldn't help Lin explain what's happened since - scoring the most points (136) in any player's first five games as a starter since the NBA merged with the ABA in 1976, and a contract that's guaranteed for the rest of the season.

"No, but I believe in an all-powerful and all-knowing God who does miracles," Lin said.

If that Christian sentiment sounds familiar, yes, Lin has been frequently compared to Denver quarterback Tim Tebow. Both relied on their faith as much as their previously overlooked skills to guide them through hot streaks that made them sensations even beyond their sports.

Tebow carried the Broncos right into the playoffs, and now there are some who believe Lin can do the same with the Knicks.

"A guy like this is great for the game and has drawn a lot of interest from bettors on the Knicks games also," Kevin Bradley, the Bovada.lv sports book's manager said. "I am having visions of how the public was treating the Giants going into the Super Bowl being the hottest team in the NFL and costing us a mint, and right now the Knicks are by far the biggest loser for the book. …

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