Resilience and Family Caregiving

By Coon, David W. | Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics, January 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

Resilience and Family Caregiving


Coon, David W., Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics


ABSTRACT

Family caregiving for people with dementia and grandparents raising grandchildren both remain critical issues for our increasingly diverse and aging society. Very little research has focused on the role of resilience in either of these caregiving literatures, thereby creating opportunities for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers to drive future agendas including the development, evaluation, and dissemination of caregiver interventions grounded in resilience frameworks. This chapter reviews key issues related to caregiver resilience and makes several recommendations to help move its study and application forward, including the use of mixed-methods and prospective longitudinal designs, the application and evaluation of relevant theoretical frameworks, and the examination of interventions at different levels that target both mental and physical health outcomes with diverse populations.

INTRODUCTION

Family caregivers are the backbone of long-term care, with over 45 million Americans providing an average of 21 hours per week of unpaid care to impaired older adults (National Alliance for Caregiving [NAC] & AARP, 2009). However, family caregiving for older adults, particularly older adults with Alzheimer's disease or a related disorder (ADRD), comes with other price tags, including well- documented negative physical, emotional, and social outcomes ranging from depression and poor health to social isolation and increased risk of mortality (e.g., Coon, Ory, & Schulz, 2003; Sörensen & Conwell, 2011). To date, the vast majority of research on caregiving for older adults focuses on the negative outcomes associated with the caregiving role; as a result, a growing body of research in the last two decades has focused on the development, implementation, and evaluation of interventions to address these negative outcomes (Coon, Keaveny, Valverde, Dadvar, & Gallagher-Thompson, in press; Gallagher-Thompson & Coon, 2007).

Similarly, grandparent caregivers experience many negative physical and mental health consequences including personal (e.g., poor physical health, insomnia, depression, role overload), interpersonal (poor relations with adult children, struggles with parenting, social isolation, marital strife), and economic consequences. These negative outcomes are above and beyond those experienced by their noncaregiving grandparent peers (Hayslip & Kaminski, 2005; Goodman, Scorzo, Ernandes, & Alvarez-Nuñez, in press; Musil et al., 2010). The impact on grandparents continues to grow with the number of children younger than 18 years living with grandparents increasing from 8% in 2001 to 10% in 2010 totaling almost 7.5 million children living with their grandparents in 2010. Twenty-two percent of those children were living without one of their parents in the household (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2010).

What Makes Caregiving Stressful?

For caregivers to impaired older adults, the stress often multiplies with cumulative disease progression, unpredictable care recipient moods and behaviors (particularly with ADRD patients), diminished social support and constriction of social outlets, and a lack of preparedness to meet demands (Coon et al., in press; Coon et al., 2003; Mausbach et al., 2007). For grandparents, their caregiver stress is often associated with their adult child including feelings of disappointment and resentment in addition to the various care demands of raising a grandchild, especially if that grandchild has developmental, emotional, or behavioral difficulties (Hayslip & Kaminski, 2005; Hayslip & Shore, 2000). Many grandparent caregivers take on the caregiving role while they are grieving the loss (e.g., death or incarceration of an adult child or child-in-law) that put them in the role. Typically, these stressors are magnified as they also deal with the grief or loss expressed by their grandchildren (Hayslip & Kaminski).

Researchers, practice professionals, administrators, and family caregivers themselves sometimes forget that caregiving occurs in a context. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Resilience and Family Caregiving
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.