American Journalism: History, Principles, Practices

By Sweeney, Michael S. | Journalism History, Fall 2002 | Go to article overview

American Journalism: History, Principles, Practices


Sweeney, Michael S., Journalism History


Sloan, W. David, and Lisa Mullikin Parcell, eds. American Journalism: History, Principles, Practices. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, 2002. 384 pp. $39.95.

Some things are better than the sum of their parts. American Journalism, a collection of thirty-eight essays focusing on the historical development of one aspect of the foundations of journalism, is the opposite. While the book's overall standard gets high marks, some essays are better than others, and, taken as a whole, there is a bit too much overlap from chapter to chapter. Thus, the work, edited by prolific author and American Journalism Historians Association founder W. David Sloan and a doctoral student at the University of Alabama, works better as a reference for those seeking an overview of, say, the history of objectivity (chapter 21 or investigative journalism (chapter 22) than as a text to be read cover to cover.

The book aims to help journalists and students better understand their profession and to give a richer context for their work today. It achieves those goals. Between one set of covers, it brings together a range of concepts from several shelves of books about history, mass media principles and concepts, and professional practices. The mix ranges from Margaret Blanchard's summary of press freedom to Jim McPherson's examination of mergers, chains, and other economic factors to chapters on the history of war coverage and sports journalism. While the standard events and principles are developed, many pleasant surprises spring from the pages. For example, this reviewer was delighted to learn that the chief of the U.S. Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot, is credited with forming the first official press bureau. Or that pioneering NBC co-anchors Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, reading the evening news into television cameras in separate cities, ended stories with each other's names (as in, "That's the news at the White House today, Chet. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

American Journalism: History, Principles, Practices
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.