Content Analysis of Financial Services Review

By Hanna, Sherman D.; Ji, HoJun et al. | Financial Services Review, Fall 2011 | Go to article overview

Content Analysis of Financial Services Review


Hanna, Sherman D., Ji, HoJun, Lee, Jonghee, Son, Jiyeon, Letkiewicz, Jodi, Lim, HanNa, Zhang, Lishu, Financial Services Review


Abstract

We conduct a content analysis of all regular articles in Volumes 1-18 of Financial Services Review and report distribution of articles by keywords, JEL classification codes, topics, research approaches, datasets, statistical methods, and authors. We also report the most influential articles and authors based on Google Scholar citations. Comparing article topics to Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) Exam topics, we find a mismatch between distribution of article topics and the weights of the topics on CFP® Exam, with the majority of article topics being investments, while estate planning and insurance are under-represented relative to their topic weights on the CFP® Exam. © 2011 Academy of Financial Services. All rights reserved.

JEL classifications: C10; C61; D14; E21; G10

Keywords: Content analysis; Financial planning; Journal review; Citation index; Statistical methods

1. Introduction

Financial Services Review has been a leading research journal in the financial services field since 1991. There are 329 articles in Volumes 1-18 on a variety of topics. The primary purpose of this article is to provide insight into the patterns of research in the regular journal articles published in Financial Services Review. We focus on some important aspects of publications with which researchers, educators, students, and practitioners should be familiar, including overview of trends in research topics, methods, and dataseis used in articles as well as identifying the most influential authors and publications. Geistfeld and Key (1986) describe this type of review of journal content as a form of content analysis that can help identify the focus of a journal and trends over time. Ji, Hanna, Lawrence, and Miller (2010) perform a content analysis of the first 20 volumes of the Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, which is another research journal with a focus on personal finance, so we compare some of our results to their results. Our analyses demonstrate trends in topics, research methods, and influential authors in Financial Services Review.

The remainder of this article proceeds as follows. We describe criteria and procedures used in analyzing the articles. We then present results based on six major aspects of the articles: authors, classification of subjects, research approach (normative vs. positive vs. other), statistical methods, dataseis for surveys, and citations.

2. Methodologies

2.1. Authors and trends in co-authorship

We count someone as being an author regardless of the order of authorship. We present tabulations of the most frequently published authors as well as trends in co-authorship of articles and also analyze the gender of authors.

2.2. Classification of articles

We classify article topics using three methods: keywords, Journal of Economic Literature (JEL) categories, and topics. Keywords and JEL classification codes are assigned to articles as a way of classifying content and facilitating searches and indexing. JEL categories are commonly required to be supplied by authors of articles in economics journals, and there are many detailed categories (American Economic Association, 2010). Because authors choose keywords and JEL categories, there is no guarantee of consistency in categorization. Ideally, keywords should provide succinct information regarding the main topic(s) of articles. Ji et al. (2010) state that properly assigned keywords can assist readers in understanding the content of an article. However, some previous content analysis articles note problems related to keywords that may prevent their use as effective research tools, including inconsistency and inappropriate keywords (James & Cude, 2009; Ji et al., 2010).

Articles before Volume 8 do not include keywords or JEL categories, and a few articles after Volume 8 do not include them either. For the articles missing JEL codes, we assign codes based on content to have a more comprehensive analysis of subject matter. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Content Analysis of Financial Services Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.