From Bath to Bach

By Williams, Peter | Musical Times, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

From Bath to Bach


Williams, Peter, Musical Times


From Bath to Bach A provincial organ builder in Victorian England: William Sweetland of Bath Gordon DW Curtis Ashgate (Farnham, 201 1); xix, 307pp; £65, $124.95. ISBN 978 ? 4094 1752 I.

Gordon Curtis is a member of the British Institute of Organ Studies (BIOS), whose speciality is documenting and saving, where it can, the country's organ legacy, both the instruments and a recognition of their historic role. Curtis also benefited from the professional Masters and Doctoral Programmes in organology run by the University of Reading in the days when Music Departments felt it their duty to train students to make a useful contribution to the community.

After introducing life in Victorian England, perhaps inevitably without great depth, the author introduces Sweetland and his residences in Bath where his public activities as painter, architect and organ-builder were based (and where he kept a lady he was not married to). Painstaking research in censuses, local archives, inventories, BIOS's National Pipe Organ Register and other such material has produced a detailed, no-stone-unturned picture of lively activities in a major provincial city, a case study such as could be undertaken for any roughly comparable town (Cheltenham? Norwich? Brighton?) or for any branch of contemporary musical life (in theatres, market-places, concert halls, town halls). Although the density of information is not very rewarding for a casual reader, the roll-call of personnel, towns and instruments results in a useful reference book for diocesan advisers as well as the lively band of organ-devotees.

Not the only organ-builder at the time in Bath or the West Country, Sweedand (1822- 1910) is praised by the author for the quality of his workmanship and materials, with some 40 instruments alone produced during a peak in the late 1860s, modest church and chapel organs but with no major commission for a cathedral or town-hall organ. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

From Bath to Bach
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.