Improving Service Quality by Using Organizational Citizenship Behavior: Iranian Evidence

By Yaghoubi, Nour-Mohammad; Salehi, Mahdi et al. | Iranian Journal of Management Studies, September 2011 | Go to article overview

Improving Service Quality by Using Organizational Citizenship Behavior: Iranian Evidence


Yaghoubi, Nour-Mohammad, Salehi, Mahdi, Moloudi, Jamshid, Iranian Journal of Management Studies


Introduction

One of the most essential factors to realize this objective, especially in service organizations, is service quality (Salehi et al., 2009). The quality of service is dependent upon a variety of factors. A factor which may contribute to the sustainable upgrading of the service quality and faithfulness of customers is internal marketing. Internal marketing is a major activity in the development of a customer-oriented organization. The main objective of internal marketing is to promote the knowledge about internal and external customers and lift the operational obstacles which may be in the way of making the services based on values and organizational effectiveness (Christopher, 1991).

Internal marketing views the employees and jobs as internal customers and internal products, respectively (Lee and Chen, 2005). In the market-oriented literature and strategic management, more attention was paid to the external factors of an organization, although you can see today that a balance should be created between the external and internal factors, as both are critical for a strategy to be successful (Lings, 1999). Foreman and Money (1995) held that when an organization has an internal chain of supply comprising internal customers and suppliers, the organization's management ought to view the organization as a market. This means that meeting the internal customer needs will put the organization in better conditions to provide high-quality services to the external customers (Foreman and Money, 1995). Therefore, internal marketing is an important activity in the development of a customer-oriented organization.

Internal Marketing

One of the most basic definitions of the concept of internal marketing is, according to Cahill (1995), presented by Berry and Parasuraman in their book Marketing Services: Competing Through Quality (1991): "Internal marketing is attracting, developing, motivating, and retaining qualified employees through job-products that satisfy their needs. Internal marketing is the philosophy of treating employees as customers-indeed, "wooing" employees...-and is the strategy of shaping job-products to fit human needs" (Cahill, 1995).

This definition emphasizes the importance of satisfying employees' needs in order to attract, develop, motivate and retain the best-qualified personnel, and it has a strong influx of human resource management thinking. In fact, there has been some critique put forward concerning this matter, in which a line between human resource management and marketing has been attempted to be drawn (Rafiq and Ahmed, 1993, Ballantyne, 2000).

Some definitions of the concept emphasize customer-consciousness and sales-mindedness among the personnel, such as Johnson and Seymour (1985), which argue that internal marketing activities ought to: "create an internal environment which supports customer consciousness and sales-mindedness" (Johnson and Seymour, 1985) and Grönroos' (1994) definition of the concept, which states that: "the internal market of employees is best motivated for service mindedness and customer-oriented performance by an active, marketing-like approach, where a variety of activities are used internally in an active, marketing like and coordinated way".

Other definitions of internal marketing underscore the importance of an understanding of the firm's mission and objectives among the employees, such as Johnson, Scheuing, and Gaida (1986), who define it as a: "service firm's efforts to provide all members of the organization with a clear understanding of the corporate mission and objectives and with the training, motivation, and evaluation to achieve the desired objectives". Recent definitions of the concept stress the purpose of enhancing service quality: "It is a strategy for developing relationships between staff across internal organizational boundaries. This is done so that staff autonomy and know-how may combine in opening up knowledge generating processes that challenge any internal activities that need to be changed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Improving Service Quality by Using Organizational Citizenship Behavior: Iranian Evidence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.